Severed rattlesnake head bites man, delivers highly dangerous dose of venom 

Rattlesnakes can be incredibly aggressive, and it appears that decapitating one won’t stop it from attacking.

Over the Memorial Day weekend, a man in Corpus Christi, Texas was bitten by the severed head of one of the slithering, venomous creatures. 

Area station KIII reports that he was out doing yard work when the snake showed up. He used a shovel to separate the reptile’s head from its body then, likely assuming it was dead, reached down to pick it up. It was not, and the decapitated head delivered a significant bite. 

13 PHOTOS
Rattlesnake Round-up in Texas
See Gallery
Rattlesnake Round-up in Texas
A rattlesnake slithers across the rattlesnake pit at the 48th annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 12, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
Rattlesnakes are milked for their venom inside the milking pit at the annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 11, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the world's largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
A woman reacts to a holding tank of rattlesnakes at the World's Biggest Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 14, 2009. The round-up was started 51 years ago by the Jaycees as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. The Jaycees is a leadership training organization for young men and women between the ages of 21-39. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
Megan Hurst, 13, reacts as Sweetwater Jaycee Jody Gray (L) drapes a rattlesnake around her neck at the World's Biggest Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 14, 2009. The round-up was started 51 years ago by the Jaycees as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. The Jaycees is a leadership training organization for young men and women between the ages of 21-39. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
A woman adjusts the daily total of pounds of rattlesnake brought in for Andy Lee's team at the World's Biggest Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 14, 2009. The round-up was started 51 years ago by the Jaycees as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. The Jaycees is a leadership training organization for young men and women between the ages of 21-39. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) ANIMALS)
People in the crowd react as a Sweetwater Jaycee prepares to pick up a rattlesnake at the World's Biggest Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 14, 2009. The round-up was started 51 years ago by the Jaycees as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. The Jaycees is a leadership training organization for young men and women between the ages of 21-39. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi (UNITED STATES SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS)
Sweetwater Jaycee Jasen Wells kicks back to clear a space inside the Rattlesnake pit at the 48th annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 10, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. The snakes are brought into the coliseum and kept in pits which must be stirred by the snake handler so that the snakes don't suffocate. The snakes are then milked for their venom, weighed, measured, and sexed before being butchered and skinned. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
Casey Bynam carries a spray can full of gasoline with a copper tube, used to flush rattlesnakes out of their dens, as he makes his way down a hillside in Maryneal, Texas March 10, 2006. Sweetwater, Texas is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
A child watches as a Sweetwater Jaycee snake handler lifts a rattlesnake up to the crowd for people to touch at the 48th annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 10, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
Sweetwater Jaycee Tommy W. Woods, 63, takes a handful of sticks used to hunt snakes out of his pickup truck at the 48th annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 10, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. Woods has been handling snakes for 29 years. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
Sweetwater Jaycees unload boxes full of snakes delivered by a snake hunter to the 48th annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 10, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the World's Largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
Blade Woods is lifted up by his grandfather at the annual Rattlesnake Round-up in Sweetwater, Texas March 11, 2006. Sweetwater is home to the world's largest Rattlesnake Round-up which started as a way for ranchers to rid the abundance of snakes that were threatening their livestock. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The man reportedly lost his vision and began to have seizures. He was rushed to the hospital where he received 26 doses of anti-venom. 

Doctors did not initially think he would survive, but his condition has since stabilized. 

While rare, such incidents are always in the realm of possibility. 

Steven Beaupré, a University of Arkansas professor, explained to Live Science that the biting reflex in venomous snakes is strong and can endure for hours after death. 

Gizmodo further notes that it generally takes cold-blooded creatures longer to die than warm-blooded ones, as their slow metabolisms keep their organs functioning for some time. 

Read Full Story