Ronald Reagan's daughter says her dad would be 'appalled and heartbroken' at Trump's presidency

Late President Ronald Reagan’s daughter said her father would be “appalled and heartbroken” at the current Trump administration, according to her op-ed.

Patti Davis, 66, in her Washington Post essay published Sunday, recalled how much Reagan loved America and “the deep respect he had for our democracy” as the anniversary of his death on June 5, 2004 draws near.

At the same time, Davis said, if Reagan had been alive today, he’d say “he’d be pretty horrified at where we’ve come to.”

“He would be appalled and heartbroken at a Congress that refuses to stand up to a president who not only seems ignorant of the Constitution but who also attempts at every turn to dismantle and mock our system of checks and balances,” she added.

Without naming President Trump, Davis took a jab at his dislike of the media and noted how her father supported freedom of the press.

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Official Portrait of President Ronald Reagan, 1981. Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981-1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967-1975). (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
Ronald Wilson Reagan (1911-2004) 40th President of the United States (1981-1989) and 33rd Governor of California (1967-1975). Head-and-shoulders portrait with stars-and-stripes in background, circa 1985. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
President Bill Clinton poses July 16, 1997 in Washington, DC. Clinton met with America Online chairman Steve Case and other industry leaders and spoke out in favor of software tools to restrict children's access to adult content on the Internet. (Photo by Diana Walker/Liaison)
President Bill Clinton listens to speeches during the World War II Memorial Groundbreaking Ceremony on the National Mall November 11, 2000, in Washington. (Photo by Alex Wong/Newsmakers)
US President George W. Bush poses for a portrait in this undated photo January 31, 2001 at the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo courtesy of the White House/Newsmakers)
U.S. President George W. Bush arrives on the South Lawn of the White House after a three day trip September 25, 2005 in Washington, DC. President Bush spent the weekend in Austin, Texas., Colorado Springs, Colorado and in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, monitoring the effects of Hurricane Rita on the Gulf Coasts of Texas and Louisiana. (Photo by Roger L. Wollenberg-Pool/Getty Images)
U.S. President George W. Bush poses for photographs during a meeting with President of Mali Amadou Toumani Toure in the Oval Office at the Whtie House February 12, 2008 in Washington, DC. According to White House Press Secretary Dana Perino, the two leaders discussed insecurity in northern Mali, the President's Malaria Initiative and the Millennium Challenge Account, among other subjects. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
In this photo provided by the Obama Transition Office, U.S. President-elect Barack Obama poses for an official portrait on January 13, 2009 in Washington, DC. On January 20 Obama will be sworn in as the nation's 44th president. (Photo by Pete Souza/Obama Transition Office via Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama arrives for The Inaugural Ball at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on January 21, 2013 in Washington, United States. (Photo by Michael Kovac/WireImage)
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“He didn’t always like the press — no president does — but the idea of relentlessly attacking the media as the enemy would never have occurred to him,” she wrote. “And if someone else had done so, he wouldn’t have tolerated it.”

Trump continuously refers to news organizations as “fake news” and had tweeted they’re “the enemy of the American people.”

The actress and author also indicated Reagan would disapprove of the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

“He would ask us to think about the Statue of Liberty and the light she holds for immigrants coming to America for a better life. Immigrants like his ancestors, who persevered despite prejudice and signs that read ‘No Irish or dogs allowed,’” she wrote. “There is a difference between immigration laws and cruelty. He believed in laws; he hated cruelty.”

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