Sarah Huckabee Sanders can't answer kid's question about school shootings

A young boy, clad in a suit and tie, just wanted to know what the Trump administration is doing to prevent school shootings.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders couldn’t give him an answer.

“I think as a kid and certainly as a parent, there’s nothing that could be more terrifying for a kid to go to school and not feel safe,” she said, her voice trembling with emotion, on Wednesday. “I'm sorry that you feel that way.”

Despite getting choked up as she responded, Sanders couldn’t provide any specific details as to what President Trump has lined up to curb gun violence.

“At my school we recently had a lock down drill. One thing that affects my and other students’ mental health is the worry about the fact that me or my friends could get shot at school,” the boy said. “Specifically, can you tell me what the administration has done and will do to prevent these senseless tragedies?”

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The student journalist diligently grasped his pen awaiting a response from Sanders which never came.

“This administration takes it seriously and the school safety commission that the president convened is meeting this week again,” she said. “An official meeting to discuss the best ways forward and how we can do every single thing within our power to protect kids in our schools and to make them feel safe and make their parents feel good about dropping them off.”

President Trump, who recently spoke at the National Rifle Association’s annual gathering, has done little on the federal front to reign in guns laws or improve school safety following a spate of school shootings.

Following the Parkland, Fla., shooting in February, Trump promised to raise the minimum age requirement to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21 and vowed to ban bump-stocks, but the administration has made no effort on either front.

He has also talked about arming teachers, a controversial proposal backed by the gun lobby.