President Trump signs 'Right To Try' legislation into law

President Trump signed the "Right to Try Act" Wednesday. The bill allows terminally ill patients to use experimental drugs that have not been fully approved by the Food and Drug Administration. 

"Thousands of terminally ill Americans will finally have the help, the hope and the fighting chance — and I think it is going to be better than a chance — that they will be cured," President Trump said during the signing ceremony.

To be clear, experimental drugs would still need to clear the FDA's first approval phase, meaning drugmakers must prove their product does not cause harm to humans.

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Trump signs 'Right To Try' bill into law
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Trump signs 'Right To Try' bill into law
U.S. President Donald Trump shows off the signed "Right to Try Act," which gives terminally ill patients the right to use experimental medications not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Seven-year-old Muscular Dystrophy patient Jordan McLinn, from Indiana, receives a pen from U.S. President Donald Trump after the president signed the "Right to Try Act," which gives terminally ill patients the right to use experimental medications not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Seven-year-old Muscular Dystrophy patient Jordan McLinn, from Indiana, is embraced by U.S. President Donald Trump during the president's signing of the "Right to Try Act," which gives terminally ill patients the right to use experimental medications not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives prior to signing the "Right to Try Act," which gives terminally ill patients the right to use experimental medications not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
U.S. President Donald Trump greets ALS patient Matthew Belina, from Pennsylvania, prior to the president signing the "Right to Try Act," which gives terminally ill patients the right to use experimental medications not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 30: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) signs a bill as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patient Jordan McLinn (R) of Indiana looks on during a bill signing ceremony at the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Building May 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump has signed S. 204, the 'Right to Try Act' into law. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 30: U.S. President Donald Trump holds up and show a bill during a bill signing ceremony at the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Building May 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump has signed S. 204, the 'Right to Try Act' into law. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 30: U.S. President Donald Trump (L) speaks as Vice President Mike Pence (R) looks on during a bill signing ceremony at the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Building May 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump has signed S. 204, the 'Right to Try Act' into law. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 30: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a bill signing ceremony at the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Building May 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Trump has signed S. 204, the 'Right to Try Act' into law. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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Vice President Mike Pence has been a supporter of the Right to Try Act. He recently met with Jordan McLinn, a second-grader with muscular dystrophy. Jordan has become the unofficial face of Right to Try, pushing for some patients to get access to experimental treatment.

But critics argue this bill wouldn't change much, claiming it offers false hope.

Additional reporting from Newsy affiliate CNN.

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