Bernice King slams Bannon for saying MLK would be proud of Trump

Bernice King, daughter of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., recently blasted Steve Bannon for “dangerously and erroneously” using her father’s name. 

“Steve Bannon has dangerously and erroneously co-opted my father’s name, work and words. Bannon’s assertion that my father, MLK, would be proud of Donald Trump wholly ignores Daddy’s commitment to people of all races, nationalities, etc. being treated with dignity and respect,” she wrote in a series of tweets last week. 

King continued, “he would never pit one group against another in the struggle for justice, as Bannon attempts to use him to do in discussing those he termed as ‘illegal aliens’ and Black people.” 

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Marches and rallies mark 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination
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Marches and rallies mark 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination
People march in an I AM 2018 March and Rally during events surrounding the 50th anniversary of the death of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, U.S. April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht
Christian hip hop artist and rapper Julian ? J.Kwest ? DeShazier speaks to anti-racism marchers from the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA and ACT (Awaken, Confront, Transform) to End Racism as they rally to mark the 50th anniversary of the slain civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination on the National Mall in Washington, U.S. April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Anti-racism marchers from the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA and ACT (Awaken, Confront, Transform) to End Racism reach out to touch the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial as they engage in a silent march and rally to mark the 50th anniversary of the slain civil rights leader's assassination in Washington, U.S. April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
People attend a silent march and rally on the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Washington, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
Sandra Coles-Bell worships to music with others during "End Racism Rally" held by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S. and Awaken, Confront, Transform (ACT) on the National Mall on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Washington, U.S. April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: Members of Definition of Percussion Entertainment (D.O.P.E.) lead marchers from the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial to the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Actor Danny Glover gives a speech as Terry Provance holds his notes during the "End Racism Rally" held by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA and Awaken, Confront, Transform (ACT) on the National Mall on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Washington, U.S. April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Civil rights activist DeRay Mckesson speaks in front of the U.S. Capitol during the "End Racism Rally" on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the National Mall in Washington, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
People commemorating the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., hold a prayer rally on the National Mall in Washington, DC, April 4, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - People wait to march to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. April 4, 2018 in Memphis, Tennessee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: Marchers gather at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial for a silent walk to a prayer service on the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: The Rev. Dr. Leslie Copeland Tune addresses faith leaders as they prepare for a silent march from the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial to the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: The sun rises at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. A prayer march organized by A.C.T. To End Racism brought together religious leaders and others to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: Marchers silently walk from the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial to the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: Marchers gather at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial for a silent walk to a prayer service on the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: (L-R) Regina Simpson, Rev. Dionne Boissiere and Rev. Dawn Sanders gather with other faith leaders for a silent march from the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial to the National Mall to mark the 50th anniversary of King's assassination April 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Organized by A.C.T. To End Racism, religious leaders and others gathered to memorialize the day that Nobel Peace Prize and American civil rights leader King was killed while supporting a sanitation workers strike in Memphis, Tennessee. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
People arrive to march to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. April 4, 2018 in Memphis, Tennessee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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“My father would be extremely disturbed by the climate created by leaders, who have emboldened people to easily express and demonstrate cruelty, predominantly toward people of color and immigrants. Finally, MLK would be proud of a livable wage for all and not merely a low unemployment rate,” she added. 

Bannon, who served as White House chief strategist, made the comment in a recent interview with the BBC’s “Newsnight.”

“Martin Luther King would be proud of [President Trump] — what he’s done for the black and Hispanic community for jobs,” Bannon said. 

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