See the US military's most-powerful and expensive helicopter

The US Marine Corps received its first CH-53K King Stallion on Wednesday, landing at Marine Corps Air Station New River in North Carolina, according to The Drive. 

"[This is] the most powerful helicopter the United States has ever fielded," CH-53 program chief Marine Col. Hank Vanderborght said in April. "Not only the most powerful, the most modern and also the smartest."

But it's also the most expensive. With a price tag of about $144 million, it costs more than the F-35A Lightning II joint strike fighter.

Still, the King Stallion can haul three times more than the helicopter it's replacing, the CH-53E Super Stallion.

Here's what it can do:

8 PHOTOS
CH-53K King Stallion
See Gallery
CH-53K King Stallion

Engineered by Sikorsky, the CH-53K King Stallion made its first flight in 2015.

 Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation is a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, one of the largest defense contractors and political donors in the US.

Source: Defense News

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

It's about 28 feet high and 99 feet in length.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

It's powered by three T408-GE-400 turboshaft engines, which can bring the King Stallion to a maximum speed of about 230 mph.

 Photo credit: JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images

Source: US Naval Air Systems CommandThe Drive

And has a maximum altitude of about 9,520 feet.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

It also has a maximum takeoff weight of about 88,000 pounds, and can externally haul more than 27,000 pounds — three times what the CH-53E can.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

Here's a shot inside the cabin, which can fit two Humvees or a light armored vehicle.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

It's also fitted with a glass cockpit, which basically means it has digital displays, for the four-man crew, as well as fourth generation high-efficiency composite rotor blades with swept anhedral tips.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

The Marine Corps hopes to receive about 200 King Stallions.

Source: US Naval Air Systems Command

Photo Credit: US Marine Corps

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

 

See Also:

SEE ALSO: We climbed into an Apache helicopter's cockpit and saw why it's one of the most difficult aircraft to fly

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.