Georgia GOP gov. candidate wants to round up immigrants in 'deportation bus'

A Republican Georgia state senator running for governor announced the start of his “Deportation Bus Tour” on Tuesday, which he said will consist of rounding up illegal immigrants in a school bus labeled “Murderers, rapists, kidnappers, child molestors, and other criminals on board.” It misspells molesters.

Michael Williams, who was his state’s co-chair for President Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, said the tour aims to “shine a light on the dangers of sanctuary cities and the overwhelming problem of illegal immigration.” The bus will make stops in Clarkston, Decatur and Athens, the state’s three sanctuary cities. Sanctuary cities generally limit police compliance with federal immigration authorities.

“We’re not just going to track them and watch them roam around our state, we’re going to put them on this bus and send them home,” Williams said in a video promoting the bus trip.

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Central American immigrants turn to Mexico
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Central American immigrants turn to Mexico
A woman from Honduras, 20, who didn't want to be identified and who is hoping to get refugee status in Mexico, poses for a photograph with her daughter at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "Back home it's very dangerous because of the gangs and I have three more children. Mexico is a better opportunity for us," she said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Swings hang at a park in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Concepcion Bautista, 39, from Guatemala poses for a photograph with her newborn baby and her son at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. Bautista fled Guatemala after gang members threatened to kill her and seized her home, demanding money to give it back. Her ultimate goal is to reunite with her father and two sons up north, but for the time being, she believes applying for asylum in Mexico is smarter than trying to break into Trump's United States. "I'm not going back to Guatemala," she said. "I have faith that we'll be able to cross but for now, at least, I'm staying in Mexico." REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
A woman from Honduras, 40, who didn't want to be identified and who is hoping to get refugee status in Mexico, poses for a photograph with her children at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "I left Honduras because of violence, threats and extortion. I was tired working really hard and giving my money to the gangs weekly," she said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Edith Torres, 18, from Honduras poses for a photograph with her newborn baby at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "I left Honduras for a better future whether it's in Mexico or in the United States. In Honduras it's very difficult," Torres said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
A woman from El Salvador, 40, who didn't want to be identified and who is hoping to get refugee status in Mexico, poses for a photograph with her children at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "I left our home in El Salvador because of violence. I already lost one of my children in a shootout. I just want to live in peace with my children in Mexico or in the United States," she said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Vehicles cross railway tracks in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Migrants walk after crossing into Mexico, near the border between Mexico and Guatemala in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
A woman from Honduras who didn't want to be identified and who is hoping to get refugee status in Mexico, poses for a photograph with her children at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "I left Honduras because of violence and extortion from gang members," she said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Ale, 34, from Guatemala poses for a photograph with her children, Luis (L) and Maria at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "We had a small business in Guatemala and gang members used to extort us. We would like to start over in Mexico or in the United States," said Ale. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
Guatemalans wait to cross into Mexico at the border between Mexico and Guatemala on the outskirts of Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso
People walk near the border between Mexico and Guatemala in Ceibo, on the outskirts of Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Men fish on the banks of the Usumacinta River in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Welquin Rivera, 34, from Honduras talks on a mobile phone at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico April 10, 2017. Rivera was deported from the United States back to his homeland four moths ago. Now he is trying to go back to the States to be reunited with his four children. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
A pair of shoes lie on railway tracks in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Migrants from Central America eat inside a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Mobile phones are seen at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Migrants from Central America play football inside a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
A woman from Honduras, 19, who is pregnant and who didn't want to be identified, poses for a photograph at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 12, 2017. "I have three children back home in Honduras. I was part of a gang. I don't want that anymore, I got shot once in the leg. It's very dangerous to live there. I would like to go to the United States and take my children with me," she said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Amanda stands by her house in La Palma, Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. Amanda hosts migrants and provides them with food and a place to sleep for free so they can continue their journey. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Edith Torres, 18, from Honduras stands with her newborn baby at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico April 12, 2017. "I left Honduras for a better future whether it's in Mexico or in the United States. In Honduras it's very difficult," Torres said. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Migrants from Central America play cards at a migrant shelter, known as The 72, in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 10, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
Adalberto Rodriguez, 58, from Honduras crosses into Mexico on his way to the United States, near the border between Mexico and Guatemala in Tenosique, Tabasco, Mexico, April 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso 
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It’s unclear how the politician plans to lawfully apprehend immigrants, let alone deport them. Williams did not respond to a request for comment. 

Williams touted his role in some of the country’s toughest immigration laws, including one that requires local law enforcement to notify Immigration and Customs Enforcement if they have an undocumented immigrant in custody. 

Williams’ attack on sanctuary cities echoes the Trump administration’s shots at them as part of its immigration crackdown. The Department of Justice sued the state of California in March for policies meant to help local law enforcement work with immigrant communities.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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