Another Southwest flight forced to make terrifying emergency landing after cabin loses pressure

  • Another Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing Saturday evening after the cabin started to lose pressure, the airline has confirmed to Business Insider.
  • Southwest flight 861 was traveling from Denver to Dallas when the oxygen masks deployed and passengers were asked to put them on.
  • An airline representative told Business Insider there were 120 passengers on the flight, four of whom asked medical personnel to evaluate ear pain after the flight landed.

Another Southwest Airlines flight made an emergency landing Saturday evening after the cabin started to lose pressure, the airline has confirmed to Business Insider.

Southwest flight 861 was traveling from Denver to Dallas when the oxygen masks deployed and passengers were asked to put them on. An airline representative told Business Insider there were 120 passengers on the flight, four of whom asked medical personnel to evaluate ear pain after the flight landed.


"The Crew of Flight 861 traveling from Denver to Dallas Saturday night radioed ahead for paramedics to meet the aircraft after a pressurization issue in flight," the representative said. 

"Following an uneventful landing, initial reports indicate four of the 120 Customers onboard requested a check from paramedics to assess ear pain. All of the Customers were ending their journey with us in Dallas, as was the aircraft, which underwent a maintenance review."

Passenger Glen Eichelberger told CBS affiliate CBS 11 he wished the flight's crew had provided more information about the circumstances that led oxygen masks to be released.

"I had no idea what was going on or what the outcome was going to be," Eichelberger said. "There was no communication what so ever from the flight attendants or from the cockpit as far whether we were in mortal danger."

Eichelberg told CBS 11 he disagreed with Southwest's description of the landing as "uneventful."

"When you're in the air 20,000 feet above the ground and don't know what's going on, it's not uneventful," he said.

 

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Southwest plane makes emergency landing in Philly after engine incident
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Southwest plane makes emergency landing in Philly after engine incident

A Southwest Airlines flight heading from New York's LaGuardia Airport to Dallas was forced to make an emergency landing at Philadelphia International Airport on Tuesday after experiencing engine issues.

Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez

Marty Martinez, a passenger on Flight 1380, took to social media after the incident to share photos of the severe damage sustained by the aircraft, which included a damaged left engine and one blown-out window. 

Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez

A photo of the plane's damaged engine.

Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez

Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Photo: Facebook/Marty Martinez
Emergency personnel monitor the damaged engine of Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which diverted to the Philadelphia International Airport this morning after the airline crew reported damage to one of the aircraft's engines, on a runway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S. April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Emergency personnel monitor the damaged engine of Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which diverted to the Philadelphia International Airport this morning after the airline crew reported damage to one of the aircraft's engines, on a runway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S. April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Emergency personnel monitor the damaged engine of Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which diverted to the Philadelphia International Airport this morning after the airline crew reported damage to one of the aircraft's engines, on a runway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S. April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Emergency personnel monitor the damaged engine of Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 which diverted to the Philadelphia International Airport this morning after the airline crew reported damage to one of the aircraft's engines, on a runway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S. April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Mark Makela
Emergency personnel monitor the damaged engine of Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which diverted to the Philadelphia International Airport this morning after the airline crew reported damage to one of the aircraft's engines, on a runway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania U.S. April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Mark Makela TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A U.S. NTSB investigator is on scene examining damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane in this image released from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 17, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
U.S. NTSB investigators are on scene examining damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane in this image released from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 17, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
U.S. NTSB investigators are on scene examining damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane in this image released from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 17, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
U.S. NTSB investigators are on scene examining damage to the engine of the Southwest Airlines plane in this image released from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., April 17, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. NTSB photo shows parts of the engine cowling from the Southwest Airlines plane which blew its engine in mid air yesterday over the skies of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., in this image released on April 18, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
U.S. NTSB photo shows a part of the engine cowling from the Southwest Airlines plane which blew its engine in mid air yesterday over the skies of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., in this image released on April 18, 2018. NTSB/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.
@SouthwestAir These are the hero’s of SWA 1380 NYC to Dallas We lost an engine mid-flight and they guided back to P… https://t.co/0fsymQo9lU
@SouthwestAir I want to thank the crew of SWA 1380 for a great job getting us to the ground safely after losing in… https://t.co/C03wL1SYtJ
U.S. Navy Lieutenant Tammie Jo Shults, who is currently a Southwest Airlines pilot, poses in front of a Navy F/A-18A in this 1992 photo released in Washington, DC, U.S., April 18, 2018. Thomas P. Milne/U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
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This is at least the third emergency landing in the past month

Flight 861 marked at least the third emergency landing a Southwest flight has made in recent weeks. 

On April 17, a Southwest flight from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing in Philadelphia after an engine failure that sent debris through the cabin. One passenger died in that incident after being partially sucked out of a window.

On May 2, a Southwest flight from Chicago to Newark, New Jersey, made an emergency landing in Cleveland because of a cracked window. Southwest told Business Insider that plane maintained pressurization throughout the flight and that the broken window was not the result of an engine failure.

Robert Sumwalt, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said that passenger's death was the first in a US passenger airline accident in over nine years. Before that, the most recent was in February 2009 when an aircraft operated by the now defunct regional airline Colgan Air crashed near Buffalo, New York, leaving 49 people on the plane and one person on the ground dead.

The NTSB has said a full investigation of the April 17 flight will take at least a year. On May 1, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it ordered new inspections of fan blades in aircraft similar to the ones used by Southwest.

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