Sessions: Parents, children entering US illegally will be separated

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration plans to take a tougher approach to families that enter the U.S. illegally by separating parents from their children, instead of keeping them in detention together.

"If you are smuggling a child then we will prosecute you, and that child will be separated from you as required by law," Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Monday at a law enforcement conference in Scottsdale, Arizona. "If you don't like that, then don't smuggle children over our border."

Administration officials explain that the goal of the program is 100 percent prosecution of all who enter the US illegally. When adults are prosecuted and jailed, their children will be separated from them, just as would happen for a US citizen convicted and jailed.

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Central American migrants traveling in 'caravan'
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Central American migrants traveling in 'caravan'

Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, gather at a makeshift centre of Mexico's National Institute of Migration to register, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018.

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, are seen after spending the night at a sports centre in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Henry Romero)

Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, sleep at a sports centre in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, sleep underneath a blanket at a sports field in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, board a bus bound to Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, are seen on board a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, walk to the bus station to take a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, gather to board a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A man from Honduras, part of a caravan of Central American migrants moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, carries his belongings before taking a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, walk to the bus station to take a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, get ready to take a bus bound for Puebla, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A Central American migrant, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, looks at a mobile phone while resting at a sports field in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. Picture taken April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A child, part of a caravan of Central American migrants moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, peeks from underneath a blanket after waking up at a sports field in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, sleep at a sports centre in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Children, part of a caravan of Central American migrants moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, sleep at a sports centre in Matias Romero, Mexico April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A Central American migrant, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, rest at a sports field, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A Central American migrant, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, plays with a child at a sports field, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
A man stands near a boiling pot as Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, gather at a sports field, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, rest at a sports field, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, rest at a sports centre, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Central American migrants, part of a caravan moving through Mexico toward the U.S. border, stand in line to register at a makeshift centre of Mexico's National Institute of Migration, in Matias Romero, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Romero
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"If you cross this border unlawfully, then we will prosecute you. It's that simple," Sessions said.

Adults charged with illegal entry will be turned over to U.S. Marshals and sent directly to federal court. Their children will be transferred to the Office of Refugee Resettlement, part of the Department of Health and Human Services, which refers them to relatives in the US or to shelters run by private organizations.

The Department of Homeland Services says 700 children have been separated from their parents since the fiscal year began last October.

A first conviction for illegal entry carries a maximum jail term of six months.

The tougher enforcement policy is another attempt to reduce the flow of illegal immigration from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Customs and Border Protection says the number of attempted border crossings by people found to be inadmissible was three times higher in April than it was during the same month last year.

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Border Patrol agents working along the US-Mexico border
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Border Patrol agents working along the US-Mexico border
A Border Patrol agent drives his ATV during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A border patrol agent carries a bale of marijuana following a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border Patrol agents are pictured during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Ladders collected and discarded by U.S. Border Patrol agents are pictured near a section of border fence in Hidalgo, Texas, U.S., April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border Patrol agents keep watch during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Border patrol agents and a special operations group member from the Texas Ranger Division seize 297 pounds of marijuana following a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
An immigrant who jumped into a canal in an effort to escape capture after illegally crossing the Mexico-U.S. border gives up and turns himself in to a border patrol agent in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border patrol agents briefly rest after seizing 297 pounds of marijuana in a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Suspected drug mules are apprehended by border patrol agents following a drug bust at the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border patrol agents apprehend people who illegally crossed the border from Mexico into the U.S. in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near Falfurrias, Texas, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Border Patrol vehicle is seen by the current border fence in Sunland Park, U.S., in this picture taken from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A border patrol agent apprehends people who illegally crossed the border from Mexico into the U.S. in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near Falfurrias, Texas, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
An agent from the US Customs and Border Protection Agency patrols along the border between Santa Teresa, Nuevo Mexico State, in the US, and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua State, in Mexico, on April 9, 2018 where the US plans to build a 32-km-long steel wall. Mexico is carrying out a sweeping review of its cooperation with the neighbouring United States because of 'blatant' tension with Donald Trump's administration, the foreign minister said Monday. / AFP PHOTO / HERIKA MARTINEZ (Photo credit should read HERIKA MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Border Patrol agent stands along the border fence on April 6, 2018 in Calexico, California. US President Donald Trump on April 5, 2018 said he would send thousands of National Guard troops to the southern border, amid a widening spat with his Mexican counterpart Enrique Pena Nieto. The anti-immigration president said the National Guard deployment would range from 2,000 to 4,000 troops, and he would 'probably' keep many personnel on the border until his wall is built -- spelling out a lengthy mission. / AFP PHOTO / Sandy Huffaker (Photo credit should read SANDY HUFFAKER/AFP/Getty Images)
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"We are dealing with a massive influx of illegal aliens across our Southwest Border," Sessions said. "But we're not going to stand for this."

Last week, he sent 35 federal prosecutors to the southwest border region and 18 immigration judges to help deal with the increase in border crossing cases.

The new approach applies only to people arrested for attempting to enter the US illegally. The children of adults who present themselves at a designated port of entry and seek asylum will not be separated from their parents, administration officials said.

Opponents of the tougher enforcement policy strongly condemned the new approach. "This administration is set on tearing families apart, detaining immigrants without justification," said Vedant Patel of the Democratic National Committee.

 

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