Lip readers tried to decode a secretive conversation between Kim Jong Un and South Korea's president

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in stepped aside during their historic meeting in April to have a private chat,

  • Lip readers think they know what they said — including snatches of talk about nuclear weapons, the UN and President Trump.

  • It's worth remembering that lip reading isn't an exact science, and the observers had to deal with distant footage at odd angles.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in stepped aside during their historic meeting in April to have a private chat far from prying eyes — but lip readers think they've decoded parts of their chat.

According to lip readers who spoke to South Korea's Chosun Ilbo, the Korean leaders discussed mostly business as they — though President Donald Trump's presence still loomed.

Lip reading isn't an exact science, and the observers had to deal with distant footage at odd angles, but they deciphered a few topics of conversation.

"The North Korea-US summit must yield positive results and I want to take things step by step to eliminate any problems," Kim reportedly said while sitting down.

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The lip readers say they made out keywords including "nuclear weapons facility," "Trump," "United States" and "United Nations" with Moon mentioning nuclear facilities and Trump, and Kim bringing up the US and UN.

Kim reportedly also asked something about how to deal with Trump, which Moon responded to with "large hand gestures," according to Chosun.

Moon reportedly asked Kim to keep lines of communication and progress towards reunification on track.

The talk lasted around half an hour.

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