Senator Rubio says U.S. workers get little benefit from tax reform

WASHINGTON, April 30 (Reuters) - Republican U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, in a move that may undercut his party's message about the recent tax overhaul ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, told the Economist magazine there is "no evidence whatsoever" the law significantly helped American workers.

"There is still a lot of thinking on the right that if big corporations are happy, they're going to take the money they're saving and reinvest it in American workers," Rubio said in the interview published Thursday.

"In fact they bought back shares, a few gave out bonuses; there's no evidence whatsoever that the money's been massively poured back into the American worker."

The tax overhaul, which sailed through the Republican-controlled U.S. Congress in December without Democratic support, permanently cut the top corporate rate to 21 percent from 35 percent. Tax cuts for individuals, however, are temporary and expire after 2025.

Republicans, including President Donald Trump, have said their tax overhaul will lead to more take-home pay for workers and have touted the bonuses some workers received from their employers as evidence the law is working. Rubio voted for the proposal even though he had lobbied party leaders for a larger child tax credit.

21 PHOTOS
Companies that have given bonuses, increased pay since tax bill passed
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Companies that have given bonuses, increased pay since tax bill passed

Walmart

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Apple Inc.

(Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Comcast 

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Starbucks

(Photo by Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images)

American Airlines

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

AT&T

(REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The Walt Disney Co.

(REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni)

Sinclair Broadcast

(Photo via Facebook)

Bank of America

(BRYAN R. SMITH/AFP/Getty Images)

Alaska Airlines

(Photo by FG/Bauer-Griffin/GC Images)

BB&T bank

(REUTERS/Jim Young)

JetBlue 

(REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

Fifth Third Bank

(REUTERS/Joe Skipper)

Nationwide

(Photo via Facebook)

PNC Financial

(Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Southwest Airlines

(REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)

US Bancorp

(Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Boeing 

(REUTERS/Jim Young)

JPMorgan Chase

(Daniel Tepper/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Wells Fargo & Co.

(Daniel Tepper/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Home Depot

(EDUARDO MUNOZ ALVAREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

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Rubio's staff did not deny he made the statement.

"Senator Rubio pushed for a better balance in the tax law between tax cuts for big businesses and families, as he's done for years. As he said when the tax law passed, cutting the corporate tax rate will make America a more competitive place to do business, but he tried to balance that with an even larger child tax credit for working Americans," Rubio spokeswoman Olivia Perez-Cubas said in an email.

The tax law is Republicans' only significant legislative achievement since Trump took office as they head into the midterms, when all 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and about a third of the 100-member Senate's seats are being contested.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said earlier this month that the tax bill, as written, is projected to add $1.9 trillion to the national debt over the next decade.

(Reporting by Amanda Becker; Editing by Cynthia Osterman and Lisa Shumaker)

42 PHOTOS
States where Americans pay the highest in state income taxes
See Gallery
States where Americans pay the highest in state income taxes

California

State income tax: 1% to 13.3% 

Maine

State income tax: 5.8% to 10.15%

Oregon

State income tax: 5% to 9.9%

Minnesota

State income tax: 5.35% to 9.85%

Iowa

State income tax: 0.36% to 8.98%

New Jersey

State income tax: 1.4% to 8.97%

Vermont

State income tax: 3.55% to 8.95%

Washington, DC

State income tax: 4% to 8.95%

New York

State income tax: 4% to 8.82%

Hawaii

State income tax: 1.4% to 8.25%

Wisconsin

State income tax: 4% to 7.65%

Idaho

State income tax: 1.6% to 7.4%

South Carolina

State income tax: 0% to 7%

Connecticut

State income tax: 3% to 6.99%

Arkansas

State income tax: 0.9% to 6.9%

Montana

State income tax: 1% to 6.9%

Nebraska

State income tax: 2.46% to 6.84%

Delaware

State income tax: 2.2% to 6.6%

West Virginia

State income tax: 3% to 6.5%

Georgia

State income tax: 1% to 6%

Kentucky

State income tax: 2% to 6%

Louisiana

State income tax: 2% to 6%

Missouri

State income tax: 1.5% to 6%

Rhode Island

State income tax: 3.75% to 5.99%

Maryland

State income tax: 2% to 5.75%

North Carolina

State income tax: 5.75%

Virginia

State income tax: 2% to 5.75%

Oklahoma

State income tax: 0.5% to 5.25%

Massachusetts

State income tax: 5.1%

Alabama

State income tax: 2% to 5%

Mississippi

State income tax: 3% to 5%

Utah

State income tax: 5%

Ohio

State income tax: 0.495% to 4.997%

New Mexico

State income tax: 1.7% to 4.9%

Colorado

State income tax: 4.63%

Kansas

State income tax: 2.7% to 4.6%

Arizona

State income tax: 2.59% to 4.54%

Michigan

State income tax: 4.25%

Illinois

State income tax: 3.75%

Indiana

State income tax: 3.3%

Pennsylvania

State income tax: 3.07%

North Dakota

State income tax: 1.1% to 2.9%

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