Connecticut might join states trying to subvert electoral college


Lawmakers in Connecticut's House of Representatives passed a measure Thursday that would change the way the state's electoral college votes for president.

The bill, which passed largely along party lines, would give the state's electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate won the national popular vote — but there's a catch.

If the bill becomes law, it will only go into effect if enough other states sign onto the interstate compact.

Ten states have joined so far. Together, they have 165 electoral votes. The compact needs 270 electoral votes to go into effect.

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Trump receives electoral college vote
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh holds her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump before casting it at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Pennsylvania electors bow their heads in prayer before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Protesters rally outside as Michigan's 16 presidential electors meet at the State Capitol building to cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Electoral college tellers count the ballots Pennsylvania electors cast for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors take their oath of office before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters of President-elect Donald Trump hold signs in the Senate gallery as Michigan's electors cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
North Carolina's Thirteenth District Elector Ann Sullivan wears clothes adorned with patriotic and Republican Party symbols after the state's Electoral College affirmed their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Protesters shout in anger from the gallery at Pennsylvania electors after they cast their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh smiles as she returns to her seat after casting her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives pose for a group photo after formally voting for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after affirming their votes, all for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at a ceremony in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
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The vote came the same day President Donald Trump told "Fox & Friends" he would like to do away with the electoral college in favor of the popular vote. Trump won the 2016 electoral vote but lost the popular vote.

Connecticut's bill still has to go to the state's senate for approval. If it passes there, it'll head to the governor's desk to be signed. 

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