Devastating new report alleges Trump's VA nominee drunkenly 'wrecked' a government vehicle

  • New allegations of misconduct emerged Wednesday afternoon against Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, the White House physician nominated to be the next secretary of Veterans Affairs.
  • Jackson has been accused of providing "a large supply" of prescription opioids to a White House military office staffer and "wreck[ing] a government vehicle" while intoxicated at a Secret Service event, according to a new report compiled by Democratic Senate staffers.
  • The White House is continuing to stand by Jackson, who said Wednesday that he would not withdraw from the nomination process.

Bombshell allegations emerged Wednesday afternoon about the conduct of Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, the White House physician nominated to be the next secretary of veterans affairs.

Among the allegations: that Jackson provided "a large supply" of prescription opioids to a White House military office staffer and that he "wrecked a government vehicle" while intoxicated at a Secret Service event.

The charges are detailed in a two-page summary of allegations made by 23 current and former colleagues of Jackson. They were compiled by the Democratic staff of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee.

Jackson denied the allegation that he "wrecked" the government vehicle, according to CNN, and said he would not withdraw himself from the nomination process.

CNN reported Tuesday on other allegations against Jackson, including that the doctor banged on the door of a female staffer's hotel room during an overseas trip in 2015. One source said the noise was loud enough that the Secret Service intervened out of concern that he would wake then-President Barack Obama.

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US President Donald Trump shakes hands with White House Physician Rear Admiral Dr. Ronny Jackson, following his annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, January 12, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
White House, Presidential physician Ronny Jackson answers question about U.S. President Donald Trump's health after the president's annual physical during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, U.S., January 16, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Dr. Ronny Jackson after his annual physical exam at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., January 12, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
US President Donald Trump (C) and his White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson (L) listen as US Secretary of Veterans Affairs David J. Shulkin speaks about new technology used by the Department of Veterans Affairs during an event in the Roosevelt Room of the White House August 3, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
White House, Presidential physician Ronny Jackson prepares to answers question about U.S. President Donald Trump's health after the president's annual physical during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, U.S., January 16, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with Dr. Ronny Jackson after his annual physical exam at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., January 12, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16: White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson speaks to reporters during the daily briefing in the Brady press briefing room at the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama (C) walks with his physician Dr. Ronny Jackson (2nd R) to Marine One after visiting with troops at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center November 29, 2016 in Bethesda, Maryland. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 3: (AFP OUT) U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Dr.David Shulkin(right) explains equipment to White House Physician Dr. Ronny L. Jackson(left) U.S. President Donald Trump (2nd left) to be used in a new program using video and software technology to provide medical care to veterans at The White House August 3, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 24: Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, nominee for Veterans Affairs secretary, leaves Dirksen Building after a meeting on Capitol Hill with Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., on April 24, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
U.S. President Donald Trump's nominee to be U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, meets with Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) at his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
UNITED STATES - APRIL 24: Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, nominee for Veterans Affairs secretary, leaves Dirksen Building after a meeting on Capitol Hill with Sen. Jerry Moran, R-Kan., on April 24, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 17: Physician to the President U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson meets with Sen. Jon Tester (D-MT) in his office in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill April 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump nominated Jackson, his personal doctor at the White House, to be the new Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs after Trump fired David Shulkin on March 28. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 25: Veterans Affairs Secretary Nominee Dr. Ronny Jackson departs the U.S. Capitol April 25, 2018 in Washington, DC. Jackson faces a tough confirmation fight after being plagued by allegations of inappropriate behavior. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 16: Physician to the President U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson waves to journalists as he heads into a meeting with Senate Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Johnny Isakson (R-GA) in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill April 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump nominated Jackson, his personal doctor at the White House, to be the new Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs after Trump fired David Shulkin on March 28. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House press secretary, speaks to members of the media while Ronny Jackson, physician for U.S. President Donald Trump, left, smiles during a White House press briefing in Washington D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. Trump�is 'very healthy' and should remain so through his presidency, according to Jackson, who examined the president last week amid criticism that the 71-year-old commander-in-chief may be unfit for office. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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A former staffer said the "middle of the night" incident made the woman uncomfortable and was "definitely inappropriate," CNN reported.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters on Wednesday that Jackson had undergone at least four "very detailed and thorough background investigation[s]" during his time in the White House, and none of the probes, one of which was conducted by the FBI, found any issues of concern.

"None of those things have come up in the four separate background investigations that have taken place," Sanders said. "There's been no area of concern that was raised for Dr. Jackson specifically."

The White House is continuing to stand by Jackson, who drew national attention and criticism after performing Trump's first physical exam as president and later delivering a glowing report on Trump's health.

President Donald Trump suggested on Tuesday that he should withdraw from the nomination process to protect himself from the "vicious" attacks on his reputation, and appeared to dismiss the allegations against his nominee.

Republicans are calling for a confirmation hearing, which was originally scheduled for Wednesday.

"I don't want to put a man through a process like this," Trump said, calling Jackson "a wonderful man." "The fact is I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't do it. What does he need it for? To be abused by a bunch of politicians?"

"For us to hound somebody out just because somebody can make an accusation strikes me as unfair," Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican, told The New York Times.

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