Report: Trump administration to reverse Obama-era transgender rules

The Trump administration is reportedly targeting one of the nation's most vulnerable groups with possible new health rules.

The New York Times reports the administration plans to reverse an Obama-era rule that protects transgender individuals from discrimination by doctors, hospitals and insurers. 

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U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) testifies at a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for Sessions to become U.S. attorney general on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL) is sworn in to testify at a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to become U.S. attorney general on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Retired General John Kelly testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee confirmation hearing on Kelly?s nomination to be Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Protesters dressed as Klansmen disrupt the start of a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing for U.S. Attorney General-nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions (R) on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque - TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Rex Tillerson, the former chairman and chief executive officer of Exxon Mobil, testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing to become U.S. Secretary of State on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Cornell Brooks, president and CEO of the NAACP, listens to testimony during the second day of confirmation hearings on Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) nomination to be U.S. attorney general in Washington, U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Witnesses are sworn for the second day of confirmation hearings on Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) nomination to be U.S. attorney general in Washington, U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) speaks during the second day of confirmation hearings on Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL) nomination to be U.S. attorney general in Washington, U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Demonstrators protest against President-elect Donald Trump's pick for secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, outside the hearing room where Tillerson's confirmation hearing is being held today on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Rex Tillerson, former chief executive officer of Exxon Mobil Corp. and U.S. secretary of state nominee for president-elect Donald Trump, arrives to a Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. Tillerson said Russia poses a danger to the U.S. and must be held accountable for its actions, a sharp departure from comments by Trump, who has called for a friendlier relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Elaine Chao appears before the Senate The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC for her confirmation hearing to be US Secretary of Transportation, January 11, 2017. / AFP / CHRIS KLEPONIS (Photo credit should read CHRIS KLEPONIS/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 11: Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill.,listens during the confirmation hearing for Secretary of Transportation nominee Elaine Chao in the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 11: A protester disrupts the Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing for Secretary of State nominee Rex Tillerson in Dirksen Building, January 11, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 11: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduces his wife Secretary of Transportation nominee Elaine Chao during her Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee confirmation hearing on Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 12: Defense Secretary nominee retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis (L) stands with Former Defense Secretary William Cohen during his Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill, on January 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. Gen. Mattis will need a waiver from Congress to bypass a law prohibiting recently retired military officers from serving as Defense secretary. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
An anti-war protester is led from the room during testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee during the second day of confirmation hearings on Senator Jeff Sessions' (R-AL) nomination to be U.S. attorney general in Washington, U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Rex Tillerson (C), the former chairman and chief executive officer of Exxon Mobil, shakes hands with U.S. Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) as he arrives for a Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmation hearing to become U.S. Secretary of State on Capitol Hill in Washington January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 12: Defense Secretary nominee retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis arrives at his Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill, on January 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. Gen. Mattis will need a waiver from Congress to bypass a law prohibiting recently retired military officers from serving as Defense secretary. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - Former Exxon Mobile Executive Rex Tillerson appears before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations for his confirmation hearing for the post of Secretary of State on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC Wednesday January 11, 2017. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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The rule says insurers can't arbitrarily deny counseling, psychotherapy or hormone therapy to people transitioning from one gender to another. Advocates worry this will mean a return to a time when insurers could easily deny those treatments.

But the administration says it needs to change the rule because a Texas judge found parts of it violated religious freedom and rule-making laws.

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