Trump supporter films himself shooting at photo of David Hogg

A Trump supporter fired his rifle at a photo of Parkland school shooting survivor David Hogg in an incendiary video that was removed from several social media platforms.

Frank Espinoza, also known as “Lawerewolf” online, was suspended on Twitter after he shared the video and addressed the gun control activist directly as “the b---h at CNN.”

“You want to push society to a civil war? You want to make us all fight?” Espinoza asked. “You want to see what a civil war looks like? I’m going to show you what a civil war looks like David.”

Espinoza, who filmed the video at a shooting range, then aimed his rifle at a cut-out image of Hogg’s head, which was left riddled with bullet holes.

RELATED: Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg

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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
David Hogg, a student and shooting survivor from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks during a rally with Thurgood Marshall Academy students in advance of Saturday's March for Our Lives event in Washington, U.S. March 22, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
Emma Gonzalez (L), David Hogg (C) and Cameron Kasky, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, pause for a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting at Great Mills High School in Maryland, before discussing their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Emma Gonzalez (L) and David Hogg, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks at a rally calling for more gun control three days after the shooting at his school, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S. February 17, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Marjory Stoneman Douglas student David Hogg speaks during March for Our Lives to demand stricter gun control laws on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 24: Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student David Hogg speaks onstage at March For Our Lives on March 24, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Dan Rather hosts a SiriusXM Roundtable Special Event with Parkland, Florida, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Students and activists Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg (pictured), Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind, and Jaclyn Corin at SiriusXM Studio on March 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM)
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The video has also been removed from YouTube for violating the platform’s policy on “harassment and bullying.”

Espinoza also attacked Hogg in another YouTube video last month falsely claiming the teenager was not at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school when the gunman opened fire and killed 17 people.

He shared a screenshot of YouTube’s message announcing his video had been taken down, and wrote, “I was too edgy.”

The Trump supporter, who has a history of sharing bigoted content online, has built up a small following on YouTube and solicits donations from his fan base on the website Patreon.

He told Newsweek, “I’m a performance artist. I wanted to see the trajectory of where this [Internet censorship] was going.”

Another Instagram post on March 4 shows a photo of Trump holding a dove with the caption, “Time to free the internet against censorship and being banned.”

Hogg, along with several of his classmates, has attracted the ire of right-wing figures after he became a vocal gun control activist in the wake of the Parkland, Fla., shooting on Valentine’s Day.

Hogg, who celebrated his 18th birthday on Thursday, tweeted, “This year I’m going to promote love and justice so that in this great country we can all grow together and love together as Americans.”

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