Trump reportedly plans to pardon Scooter Libby

President Donald Trump reportedly plans to pardon Lewis “Scooter” Libby, the former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney who was convicted of perjury and obstruction of justice after a leak that disclosed a CIA agent’s name.

Sources told ABC News and The Washington Post that Trump has been considering the pardon for a few months, but there was no clear timeline for when it might happen.

While there was also no sense of the president’s motive for a pardon, John Bolton, Trump’s new national security adviser, was among those who advocated for Libby’s exoneration, The New York Times reported.

The chief prosecutor in Libby’s case, Patrick Fitzgerald, also happens to be friends with former FBI Director James Comey.

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Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney
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Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, former chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former chief of staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, arrives for a sentence hearing at a federal courthouse in Washington, June 5, 2007. Libby was convicted of obstructing a probe related to the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and the leaking of CIA analyst Valerie Plame's identity by members of the Bush administration. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
Scooter Libby, former Vice President Dick Cheney's former Chief of Staff, mingles before a ceremony to unveil a marble bust of Cheney in the US Capitol in Wshington, December 3, 2015. REUTERS/James Lawler Duggan
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former Chief of Staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, arrives for his sentencing hearing at U.S. District Court in Washington, June 5, 2007. Libby was convicted of obstructing a probe related to the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and the leaking of CIA analyst Valerie Plame's identity by members of the Bush administration. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former Chief of Staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, is followed by his wife Harriet Grant as he arrives for his sentencing hearing at U.S. District Court in Washington, June 5, 2007. Libby was convicted of obstructing a probe related to the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and the leaking of CIA analyst Valerie Plame's identity by members of the Bush administration. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former Chief of Staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, steps into a waiting car as he leaves the courthouse after being sentenced to 30 months in prison and fined $250,000 for his role in the CIA leak case at U.S. District Court in Washington, June 5, 2007. Libby was convicted of obstructing a probe related to the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and the leaking of CIA analyst Valerie Plame's identity by members of the Bush administration. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former Chief of Staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, leaves the courthouse with his attorney Theodore Wells (R) after being sentenced to 30 months in prison and fined $250,000 for his role in the CIA leak case at U.S. District Court in Washington, June 5, 2007. Libby was convicted of obstructing a probe related to the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war and the leaking of CIA analyst Valerie Plame's identity by members of the Bush administration. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Lewis "Scooter" Libby (C) and his wife Harriet leave the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington March 6, 2007. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, a former senior aide to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, was found guilty on Tuesday of four of five counts of obstructing justice, lying and perjury during an investigation tied to the Iraq war. Libby's attorney Theodore Wells follows at left. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
Former Bush White House aide Lewis "Scooter" Libby walks with wife Harriet Grant (R) outside the courthouse after he was convicted of four federal crimes at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington, March 6, 2007. Libby, a former senior aide to Vice President Dick Cheney, was found guilty on Tuesday of four of five counts of obstructing justice, lying and perjury during an investigation tied to the Iraq war. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES)
Lewis "Scooter" Libby listens as his attorney speaks to the media at the U.S. Federal Courthouse in Washington March 6, 2007. Libby, a former senior aide to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, was found guilty on Tuesday of four of five counts of obstructing justice, lying and perjury during an investigation tied to the Iraq war. REUTERS/Jim Bourg (UNITED STATES)
Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, former chief of staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, arrives at the U.S. Federal Court in Washington as jury deliberations in his perjury trial continue March 6, 2007. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, former chief of staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, arrives at the U.S. Federal Court in Washington as jury deliberations in his perjury trial continue March 5, 2007. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
Scooter Libby arrives on December 3, 2015, during a dedication ceremony hosted by the US Senate at Emancipation Hall of the US Capitol Visitor Center in Washington, DC. The ceremony unveiled a bust of former US Vice President Dick Cheney, who as vice president, also served as President of the Senate. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 03: Scooter Libby attends a bust unveiling ceremony former Vice President Dick Cheney in the Capitol Visitor Center's Emancipation Hall, December 3, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
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Libby was charged in 2005 with lying to the FBI, lying to investigators and obstruction of justice for discussing the identity of Valerie Plame, who at the time worked as a covert CIA operative, with various journalists. He was sentenced in 2007 to 30 months in prison and fined $250,000 for his role in the leak case.

President George W. Bush refused to grant a pardon to Libby, despite Cheney pushing for it, although he did commute Libby’s 30-month prison sentence.

Trump’s most controversial pardon to date was that of former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio last August. Arpaio has a long history of discrimination and unlawful policing towards Latinos. He’s now running for Senate

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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