Some Stonehenge rocks were in place 'long before humans' 

UK’s Stonehenge is shrouded in many mysteries, but some of them may have just been solved, reports Sky News.

Archaeologist Mike Pitts suggests that largest rocks on the site were likely there long before humans and may have served as the inspiration for further development on Salisbury Plain, notes The Times.

Two of the pieces in question are the 60-ton heel stone and a rock located in the circle’s central area. 

Pitts located large, backfilled holes near each, suggesting they were excavated and positioned upright. 

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Stonehenge throughout history
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Stonehenge throughout history
Restoration work on Stonehenge. (Photo by Brian Seed/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Restoration work on Stonehenge, replacing stones on arches. (Photo by Brian Seed/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
circa 1911: A Bristol Prier monoplanefrom the Bristol Flying School in low flight over Stonehenge. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
STONEHENGE 1958: A 60 ton crane in use at Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, to raise a slab of rock weighing 20 tons which is carefully cradled to distribute the weight. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons which crashed to earth in 1797. (Photo by PA Images via Getty Images)
STONEHENGE, Wiltshire. Re-erection of Trilithon lintel 158 by the 60 ton 'Brabazon Crane', the larger of two cranes used to lift stones. The lintel is being lowered and man-handled into its final resting position on upright stones 57 and 58. (Photo by R J C Atkinson/English Heritage/Arcaid/Corbis via Getty Images)
28th March 1958: A sixty ton crane, one of only two of its kind in the country, lifts an eighteen ton lintel of a fallen trilithon at the ancient monument of Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England. (Photo by John Franks/Keystone/Getty Images)
One of the massive pieces, No. 91 Station Stone as it is known to the Ministry of Works, is used for anchorage during preparations to straighten some of the trilithons of Stonehenge, the prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain. (Photo by PA Images via Getty Images)
circa 1965: Stonehenge in sunshine and shadow against a brilliant blue sky. (Photo by Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images)
SALISBURY, UNITED KINGDOM - JUNE 21: Solstice participants wait for the midsummer sun to rise over the megalithic monument of Stonehenge on June 21, 2007 on Salisbury Plain, England. Crowds gathered at the 5,000 year old stone circle to celebrate the Summer Solstice; the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images)
Stonehenge, Amesbury, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. Stonehenge's ring of standing stones are set within earthworks in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.
Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) west of Amesbury and 8 miles (13 km) north of Salisbury. Stonehenge's ring of standing stones are set within earthworks in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.
Aerial view of Stonehenge, prehistoric monument and stone circle, UNESCO World Heritage Site, United Kingdom.
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“It’s possible that at the end of the ice age we had two really large visible sarsen boulders, probably the two largest on Salisbury Plain, close together on the midsummer sunrise-midwinter sunset axis,” he said of those holes.

He further notes that neither stone appears to have been altered in any way that would have made them easier for transportation from elsewhere. 

While those multi-ton rocks appear to have been native to the site, the bulk of the massive stones are still believed to have been dragged from their distant places of origin. 

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