Lawmaker says he’s not like Gabby Giffords after showing off gun

 

A Republican congressman in South Carolina whipped out his personal handgun and laid it on the table in a bid to prove firearms are only dangerous when they are in the wrong hands.

“I’m not going to be a Gabby Giffords,” Rep. Ralph Norman during a “Coffee with Constituents” meeting at a Rock Hill restaurant.

Giffords, a former Arizona congresswoman, was shot outside a Tucson grocery store during a meeting with constituents in 2011. Six people were killed and another 13 were injured during the attack.

She and her husband, retired NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, have since advocated for gun control legislation.

“Americans are increasingly faced with a stark choice: leaders like Gabby, who work hard together to find solutions to problems, or extremists like the NRA and Congressman Norman, who rely on intimidation tactics and perpetuating fear,” Kelly said in response to Norman's actions.

See AlsoWhite House correspondents dinner host taunts Sarah Sanders over Trump snub

Norman, a concealed carry permit holder, told the Post and Courier he wanted to show that “guns don’t shoot people; people shoot guns.”

He also told those attending the meeting he’d be able to protect them should a shooter walk into the facility.

“I don’t mind dying, but whoever shoots me better shoot well or I’m shooting back,” he said.

The freshman lawmaker plans to pull his gun out in future meetings and does not regret doing so on Friday in the least, he said.

The move comes a day after a trio of House Republicans introduced legislation that would allow the state to consider secession should the federal government begin to “confiscate legally purchased firearms.”

8 PHOTOS
Florida lawmakers refuse to debate a gun control measure
See Gallery
Florida lawmakers refuse to debate a gun control measure
Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and those supporting them react after the Florida House of Representatives vote down a procedural move to take a bill banning assault weapons out of committee and bring it to the floor for a vote on February 20, 2018 in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. following last week's mass shooting on their campus. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and those supporting them react as they watch the Florida House of Representatives vote down a procedural move to take a bill banning assault weapons out of committee and bring it to the floor for a vote on February 20, 2018 in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. following last week's mass shooting on their campus. REUTERS/Colin Hackley TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Sheryl Acquaroli, (L), and Ashley Santoro, students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School react as they watch the Florida House of Representatives vote down a procedural move to take a bill banning assault weapons out of committee and bring it to the floor for a vote on February 20, 2018 in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. following last week's mass shooting on their campus. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Rep. Kionne McGhee, D-Miami, raises his hand as part of a move to make members of the House of Representatives have their vote recorded during his request to have a bill banning assault rifles pulled from committee and brought immediately to the House for a vote at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Sen. Bobby Powell, D-Riviera Beach, looks on his computer at gun control bills moving through the Senate as he talks with students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and those that support their cause, following last week's mass shooting on their campus, in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School walk by a sign in the Senate office building on the way to speak with Florida state legislators, following last week's mass shooting on their campus, in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Students and parents from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School advocating for a change in gun control laws listen during a meeting with Sen. Bobby Powell, D-Riviera Beach, following last week's mass shooting on their campus, at the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
Florence Yared, 17, a junior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, waits in a hallway to speak with Florida state legislators about legislation that could prevent future tragedies, following last week's mass shooting on their campus, in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Colin Hackley
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.