Trump wrongly takes credit for Central American march crackdown

President Trump again claimed victory in his campaign of misinformation against a group of desperate Central American refugees fleeing poverty, political strife and gang violence.

Trump has repeatedly mischaracterized the so-called “caravan” of migrants making their way across Mexico in recent days as a fleet of foreigners intent on invading the U.S.

The annual trek, organized by a group called Pueblo Sin Fronteras, or People Without Borders, has prompted a week of rage-filled tweets from Trump and the vow to send National Guard troops to the U.S.-Mexico border.

While a handful of the migrants may attempt to cross into the U.S. and some are planning to seek asylum, the yearly march is mostly held to raise awareness to the dangers of fleeing gang violence or political upheaval and corruption in Central American nations.

RELATED: 13 industries that won't survive without immigrants

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13 industries that won't survive without immigrants

PERSONAL APPEARANCE WORKERS

Percent of immigrant workers: 63 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 12 
Including manicurists and pedicurists, makeup artists, shampooers and skin care specialists, this industry has the highest share of immigrant workers. 

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PRIVATE HOUSEHOLD WORKERS

Percent of immigrant workers: 45 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 22 
This category includes babysitters, domestic servants such as cooks and maids, as well as chauffeurs and gardeners. 

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BUILDING AND GROUNDS CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE

Percent of immigrant workers: 34 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 17 
Because these sorts of jobs cannot be exported, worker shortages are likely to be more pronounced, forcing costs higher for businesses, economists warn. 

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AGRICULTURAL WORKERS

Percent of immigrant workers: 33 
Agriculture is another industry to be hard hit. An estimated 50 percent to 70 percent of farm workers are undocumented. If farmers lost all access to undocumented workers, agricultural output could drop $30 billion to $60 billion and push food prices up 5 percent to 7 percent, according to a American Farm Bureau Federation study. 

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APPAREL MANUFACTURING

Percent of immigrant workers: 31 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 20 
The apparel manufacturing industry relies heavily on unauthorized immigrants. The clothing in stores may be made in the USA, but not always by documented Americans. 

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CONSTRUCTION AND EXTRACTION

Percent of immigrant workers: 27 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 15 
These workers include everything from brick masons and floor sanders to drywall and ceiling tile installers. Expect construction delays and higher costs on that home or office building.  

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COMPUTER AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCE

Percent of immigrant workers: 25 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 5 
This highly skilled and highly compensated group of workers includes computer systems analysts, information security analysts, computer programmers, software developers, database administrators, and computer network architects, to name a few examples from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

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LANDSCAPING

Percent of immigrant workers: 24 
A struggle to find workers is why landscaping companies turn to visa programs. A Denver area landscape business owner said he posts ads in newspapers, on Craigslist, and on street signs for positions paying $14 to $25 an hour with health care and benefits, hiring every person who shows up -- but is lucky if any report to work, according to the Times. Offering employees $100 referral bonuses also hasn't worked. 

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ENGINEERING

Percent of immigrant workers: 24 
An annual list issued by Manpower showed that engineering, which includes mechanical, electrical, and civil engineers, is one of the 10 hardest jobs to fill in this country, though every engineer working in manufacturing supports 20 other jobs, according to the federal government. When engineers are in short supply, companies often outsource production to countries where there's more plentiful talent. 

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RESTAURANT SUPPORT STAFF

Percent of immigrant workers: 22 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 10 
The sous chef at the Yankee Rebel Tavern on Michigan's Mackinac Island told The New York Times he was coming inthree hours early each day to do tasks once done by visa workers. With cooks, dishwashers, and servers short, the restaurant's owner has been washing dishes herself. 

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PHYSICIANS

Percent of immigrant workers: 21 
Among our 164,000-plus foreign-trained doctors, more than 8,000 are from the seven nations targeted in President Donald Trump's first travel ban, Doctors for America says, citing Harvard data. Immigrant doctors are particularly essential to the rural health care system: Seeking visa guarantees from employers, they often choose to work in rural areas that highly trained U.S. citizens are leaving behind.

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HOTEL SUPPORT STAFF

Percent of immigrant workers: 21 
Innkeepers are particularly affected by the reduction of H-2B immigration visas, especially in places such as Maine where unemployment is low. Don't bother calling housekeeping, unless it's to join up

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TRANSPORTATION AND MATERIAL MOVING

Percent of immigrant workers: 19 
Percent of undocumented immigrant workers: 6 
This diverse industry includes everything from airline pilots to bus drivers, truck drivers, and locomotive engineers, but also crane and tower operators, parking lot attendants, and sailors and marine oilers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Many of the Honduran and Salvadorian migrants were attempting to visit embassies and consulates in Mexico, hoping to be recognized as asylum seekers, organizers said.

The group has been stalled in southern Mexico for days as Trump repeatedly claimed that “thousands” were marching north and aiming to enter the U.S. illegally.

Late Tuesday, Mexican foreign minister Luis Videgaray tweeted that the caravan had “disbanded.”

According to several reports, the nearly 1,200-strong group remained intact.

Trump on Thursday incorrectly claimed credit for Mexican authorities cracking down on the group.

“The Caravan is largely broken up thanks to the strong immigration laws of Mexico and their willingness to use them so as not to cause a giant scene at our Border,” Trump tweeted Thursday. “Because of the Trump Administrations actions, Border crossings are at a still UNACCEPTABLE 46 year low. Stop drugs!”

Despite Trump’s claims, Mexican immigration officials are offering most of the caravan migrants either a 20-day transit visa through Mexico or a 30-day humanitarian visa for those who want to apply for asylum in Mexico.

Trump at turns blasted Mexico for allowing the mass of migrants to trek across its country and also praised the country’s immigration laws as tougher than the U.S.

RELATED: Faces of Trump's immigration crackdown

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Faces of Trump's immigration crackdown
Mexican national Adalberto Magana-Gonzalez, 44, waits to be processed after being taken into custody by a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Mexican national Adalberto Magana-Gonzalez, 44, has his fingerprints taken after being taken into custody by a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
The badge of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team is seen in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field (R), 53, arrests Mexican national Adalberto Magana-Gonzalez, 44, in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Mexican national Adalberto Magana-Gonzalez, 44, waits to be processed after being taken into custody by a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field (R), 53, arrests Mexican national Adalberto Magana-Gonzalez, 44, in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team takes immigration fugitives into custody in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Handcuffs lie in a box at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Fugitive Operations office in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field (L), 53, arrests an Iranian immigrant in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field (R), 53, and Field Office Director David Marin arrest an Iranian immigrant in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field, 53, arrests an Iranian immigrant in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team member arrests an Iranian immigrant in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team search for an immigration fugitive in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Assistant Field Office Director Jorge Field, 53, arrests an Iranian immigrant in San Clemente, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Fugitive Operations team search for an immigration fugitive in Santa Ana, California, U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson SEARCH "NICHOLSON ARREST" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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On Easter Sunday, Trump began his assault on the asylum-seekers following a Fox News segment about the group.

“Border Patrol Agents are not allowed to properly do their job at the Border because of ridiculous liberal (Democrat) laws like Catch & Release,” he wrote. “Getting more dangerous. ‘Caravans’ coming.”

A day later, he tore into Mexico, his rival Democrats and made the case for his long-sought border wall.

“Caravans are heading here. Must pass tough laws and build the WALL. Democrats allow open borders, drugs and crime!” Trump tweeted.

The first People Without Borders caravan was organized in 2010 in the wake of the kidnapping and killing of more than 70 undocumented Central American migrants by members of a Mexican drug cartel.

“These people are frustrated and desperate,” volunteer Rodrigo Abeja told NBC News as he described those fleeing home.

Abeja said the group contained more people from Honduras — where violent protests following a contested election were shut down by military forces — than in previous years.

“About 80% of them are from Honduras,” he said. “We have around 300 minors ranging from 1-month-old to 11-years-old. As of the rest of the people, we have about 20 youths who identify as LGBT and about 400 women.”

Mexican immigration agents swarmed the camp in Matias Romero, roughly 400 miles southeast of Mexico City, on Monday after Trump started tweeting about the caravan.

The agents decided to issue most of the travelers “exit visas,” which the Mexican government has previously granted Central American caravans and other travelers seeking to reach the U.S.

Organizers said the caravan will not disperse, instead heading north soon.

Organizer Irineo Mujica said the group plans to head to Puebla, about 200 miles north, where migrants will meet with volunteer lawyers from the U.S. who are expected to help them figure out whether they might qualify for asylum or other types of immigration relief in the United States.

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