Trump infrastructure policy adviser to leave White House

White House infrastructure policy adviser DJ Gribbin is leaving his post.

Gribbin, who joined the Trump administration in February 2017, is “moving on to new opportunities,” a White House official said.

The soon-to-be departed staffer held a key role in defending the the administration’s infrastructure plan—which has stalled in Congress.

“Since he joined the team early last year, DJ has played an important part in coordinating the Administration-wide process behind the President’s infrastructure initiative,” national economic adviser Gary Cohn, who is also leaving the White House, said in a statement Tuesday.

Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy DJ Gribbin:

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Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy DJ Gribbin (L) holds up a chart showing the regulatory steps to build a highway as U.S. President Donald Trump holds the mic during a CEO town hall on the American business climate at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, U.S., April 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Washington, DC D.J. Gribbin, general counsel for the U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of the Secretary, is photographed with a view of Theodore Roosevelt Bridge in the background in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, February 28, 2008. (Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: U.S. President Donald Trump uses a chart illustrating the complexity of gaining regulatory approval construction projects during an event at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building April 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump delivered remarks and answered questions from the audience during a town hall event with CEO's on the American business climate. Also pictured are DJ Gribbin (L), Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy and Reed Cordish (R), from the Office of American Innovation. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 04: U.S. President Donald Trump uses a chart illustrating the complexity of gaining regulatory approval construction projects during an event at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building April 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Trump delivered remarks and answered questions from the audience during a town hall event with CEO's on the American business climate. Also pictured are DJ Gribbin (L), Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy and Reed Cordish (R), from the Office of American Innovation. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
D.J. Gribbin, managing director of Macquarie Capital (USA) Inc., speaks at the Bloomberg Link State and Municipal Finance Briefing held at Lighthouse International in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, March 22, 2011. The Bloomberg Link State and Municipal Finance Briefing, which runs until March 23, discusses the outlook for state and municipal finance as well as the municipal-bond market and risk of default. Photographer: Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images *** D.J. Gribbin
Special Assistant to the President for Infrastructure Policy DJ Gribbin (L) holds up a chart showing the regulatory steps to build a highway as U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a CEO town hall on the American business climate at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, U.S., April 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
DJ Gribbin speaks with US President Donald Trump(R) about the regulatory process to build a highway at a forum with Chief Executive Officers on the White House Campus on April 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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“I am grateful for his service and fully believe that the plan President Trump delivered to Congress, combined with the work we are doing administratively, will have a transformational impact on our economy,” Cohn said.

The administration proposed an infrastructure revamp that was met with resistance by both Democrats and Republicans—who were skeptical of the government’s ability to fund the overhaul.

Gribbin was present when Trump unveiled a huge flow chart during a meeting with builders to illustrate regulations around the construction of highways.

He previously advised Macquarie Capital on structuring public-private partnership transactions for government clients.

Other notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration:

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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration
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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration

White House Communications Director Hope Hicks reportedly announced her resignation after testifying about her job and being required to tell "white lies."

(Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned from his position on July 5, 2018 after a number of ethics scandals.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Rob Porter resigned as White House staff secretary in February 2018 amid abuse allegations made by his ex-wives.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was fired by President Trump in March 2018.

(Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

H.R. McMaster was replaced by John Bolton as national security advisor in March 2018.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

White House aide Kelly Sadler left her position in June 2018 after reportedly mocking Sen. John McCain.

(REUTERS/Leah Millis)

Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn announced his resignation in March 2018 after becoming a key architect of the 2017 tax overhaul 

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Sally Yates was fired from her post as acting attorney general when she refused to enforce President Trump's travel ban. 

(Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser in February after misleading Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Russian officials. 

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

President Trump announced David Shulkin was out as secretary of veterans affairs by sending a tweet announcing he had nominated his personal physican, Ronny Jackson, to replace him on March 28, 2018.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Trump fired FBI Director James Comey in early May.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned in July.

(June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus resigned in July.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Former advisor to President Donald Trump Steve Bannon resigned in August.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Anthony Scaramucci, former White House communications director was fired in July after just 10 days on the job. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Trump fired Deputy Chief of Staff Katie Walsh amid White House leaks in April.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files)

Former Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price resigned in late September. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

White House aide Omarosa Manigault insists she resigned and was not fired from her role in December 2017.

(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Trump fired U.S. Attorney in Manhattan Preet Bharara in March.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Mike Dubke resigned as White House communications director in late May.

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Walter Shaub, former Director of the United States Office of Government Ethics in Washington, DC resigned in July.

(Photo Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

White House deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka resigned in August 2017. 

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Rick Dearborn, White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Affairs, left the White House in December 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

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