Here are the laws that David Hogg and student gun-control activists from Parkland actually want to pass

  • The national conversation about guns in America has been hijacked in recent days by a controversy between a Fox News host and David Hogg, one of the student leaders of the gun-control movement that erupted following February's mass shooting at a high school in Florida.
  • Ingraham and Hogg traded barbs this week after the TV pundit personally attacked Hogg for complaining about not getting accepted into a few universities.
  • But amid the feud, the debate over guns in America rages on.
  • Here's what Hogg and other gun control activists are trying to achieve.

The controversy between Fox News host Laura Ingraham and a 17-year-old Parkland shooting survivor and gun control activist whom she mocked on Twitter continues to make headlines.

On Wednesday, Ingraham tweeted a link to a news article about David Hogg having received rejection letters from several California schools and said he "whines about it."

Hogg picked up on Ingraham's comments, tweeting "Soooo @IngrahamAngle what are your biggest advertisers...Asking for a friend. #BoycottIngramAdverts."

Although Ingraham later issued an apology to Hogg, the damage was already done. So far, a dozen companies have withdrawn their advertisements from Ingraham's show.

But amid the feud, the debate over guns in America rages on.

Earlier this week, former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens wrote an op-ed in The New York Times urging a repeal of the Second Amendment.

Meanwhile, the Never Again movement, a gun control advocacy group formed by Hogg and fellow Parkland shooting survivors, continues its push for stricter gun laws.

More: Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg

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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
David Hogg, a student and shooting survivor from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks during a rally with Thurgood Marshall Academy students in advance of Saturday's March for Our Lives event in Washington, U.S. March 22, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
Emma Gonzalez (L), David Hogg (C) and Cameron Kasky, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, pause for a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting at Great Mills High School in Maryland, before discussing their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Emma Gonzalez (L) and David Hogg, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks at a rally calling for more gun control three days after the shooting at his school, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S. February 17, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Marjory Stoneman Douglas student David Hogg speaks during March for Our Lives to demand stricter gun control laws on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 24: Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student David Hogg speaks onstage at March For Our Lives on March 24, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Dan Rather hosts a SiriusXM Roundtable Special Event with Parkland, Florida, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Students and activists Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg (pictured), Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind, and Jaclyn Corin at SiriusXM Studio on March 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM)
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Here's exactly what they're pushing for:

Ban "assault weapons"

Gun control activists, particularly those who attended the "March for Our Lives" rallies in cities across the US on March 24, frequently talk about banning assault weapons.

They often point to the fact that assault weapons like AR-15-style rifles were used in the deadly mass shootings in Parkland, Las Vegas, Orlando, Connecticut, and Texas.

But how such a proposal would actually work — and which types of gun would be included in the ban — is a lot more complicated than it seems.

The National Rifle Association and many gun rights activists believe that an assault weapons ban is a catch-all attempt to confiscate most commonly owned firearms.

More on the NRA:

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The National Rifle Association (NRA) and gun rights supporters
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The National Rifle Association (NRA) and gun rights supporters
A gun rights demonstrator armed with a rifle walks past a sign memorializing the children and teachers killed in the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut in 2012, as protesters aligned with the Women's March hold a rally against the National Rifle Association at NRA headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia, U.S. July 14, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre speaks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Supporters listen to U.S. President Donald Trump deliver remarks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to deliver remarks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Supporters wait for U.S. President Donald Trump to deliver remarks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Onlookers, including a man wearing a National Rifle Association (NRA) t-shirt, watch as a 95-by-50-foot American flag is unfurled on the side of an apartment complex, a replica of the "The Great Flag" that was spun, woven, dyed, constructed and displayed on the same building by Amoskeag Manufacturing Company in 1914, in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., June 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
NRA Executive Director Chris Cox (L) and Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre (R) welcome U.S. President Donald Trump (C) onstage to deliver remarks at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., April 28, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
File Photo: NRA gun enthusiasts view Sig Sauer rifles at the National Rifle Association's annual meetings & exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. on May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Gun enthusiasts look over Smith & Wesson guns at the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meetings and exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II/File Photo
James Bell from Nashville, TN, look over rifle scopes from Burris Riflescope at the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meetings and exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S. May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II/File Photo
Gun enthusiasts poses for a picture with an FN MK 48 machine gun and a MK 19 grenade launcher at the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meetings & exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Gun enthusiasts look over guns at FN America firearms at the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meetings and exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Gun instructor Robert Allen (L) works with Eathan Hawkins (8) at the air gun range at the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meetings and exhibits show in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Indiana Governor Mike Pence addresses members of the National Rifle Association during their NRA-ILA Leadership Forum at their annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, May 20, 2016. REUTERS/John Sommers II
Attendees recite the pledge of allegiance before the National Rifle Association's NRA-ILA Leadership Forum during their annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, May 20, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Attendees visit the trade booths during the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Attendees visit the trade booths during the National Rifle Association's (NRA) annual meeting in Louisville, Kentucky, May 21, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists hold a protest and vigil against gun violence on the third anniversary of the Sandy Hook mass shooting, outside the National Rifle Association (NRA) headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia December 14, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Brendan Walsh looks at a rifle scope in the trade booths showroom during the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee April 12, 2015. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Fans wait in line to meet musician and supporter of the NRA, Ted Nugent, who was signing autographs during the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee April 12, 2015. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Musician and supporter of the NRA, Ted Nugent, signs autographs during the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee April 12, 2015. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Dave Verner looks at pistols and scopes in the trade booth area during the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee April 11, 2015. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Brett Throckmorten of Barnes Bullets shows Logan Wingo how to sight down an electronic rifle in the trade booth area during the National Rifle Association's annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, April 11, 2015. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
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But David Hogg insists the Never Again Movement "is not trying to take away your guns."

"We're trying to take back our lives," he told The Outline, a digital media outlet. "Just as much as you have a right to own a weapon, we have a right to liberty, we have the right to peace, and we have the right to live."

Prohibit high-capacity magazines

The second legislative goal the "March for Our Lives" protestors want to accomplish is implementing a limitation on the number of bullets a firearm can hold.

Though it's unclear what exactly that limitation would be, high-capacity magazines are typically defined as those that carry more than 10 rounds of ammunition.

On Friday, for instance, lawmakers in Vermont passed a gun control law that banned high-capacity magazines. It defined "high-capacity" as more than 15 rounds for handguns and more than 10 rounds for all other firearms.

Close background-check loopholes

There is currently no federal law mandating that buyers pass a background check when purchasing a firearm online or at a gun show from a private, unlicensed seller.

The gun control activists from Parkland and supporters of the "March for Our Lives" wants to change that by requiring a background check "on every gun sale, no exceptions."

It's worth noting that some states have laws requiring background checks for purchases from private, unlicensed dealers.

Additional proposals

During an interview with The Outline, Hogg said that policymakers need to define which individuals with a mental illness should and should not be able to buy a gun.

But he also outlined three other specific solutions he believes will help reduce gun violence:

  • Slap a 10% tax on all firearms sales
  • Raise the minimum federal age of gun ownership and possession to 21
  • Increase spending for mental health care programs

Currently, federal law prohibits federally licensed dealers from selling a handgun to anyone under 21, but individuals older than 18 are still allowed to purchase a long gun or rifle.

Federal law also states that all sales of shotguns and rifles by manufacturers, producers, and importers are subject to an 11% excise tax. Handgun sales are taxed at 10%.

There's also an 11% federal excise tax on "the sale of firearms and ammunition by manufacturers, producers, and importers."

Some gun control advocates have previously proposed taxing bullets or levying additional taxes on gun sales to fund gun violence prevention research and treat gunshot victims.

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Rejected by 4 colleges 'and whines about it': A Fox News host mocked a Parkland shooting survivor — now he's going after her advertisers

DON'T MISS: A ban on assault weapons is a lot more complicated than it seems

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