CDC warns that second wave of flu season is just beginning

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has issued an unfortunate warning to Americans amid an already deadly flu season: It's not quite over yet.

According to a March 23 statement by the organization, a wave of the sometimes fatal Influenza B is spreading across the country at an unusually high rate.

Although reported cases of influenza A (H3N2), which have dominated this flu season, decreased during the week of March 11, cases of Influenza B saw an unusual uptick over the same time period. 

CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund told CNN that parents of young kids should be especially vigilant about the second wave.

"We know that illness associated with influenza B can be just as severe as illness associated with influenza A," Nordlund said. "We also know that influenza B tends to be more severe for younger children."

The CDC recommends that everyone, even those who have come down with the flu this year, get vaccinated against the disease, as it is possible to become sick with multiple strains during a single flu season.

RELATED: The deadliest diseases in modern history: 

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The deadliest infectious diseases in modern history
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The deadliest infectious diseases in modern history

HIV/AIDS: as of 2012, roughly 36 million deaths worldwide since discovery; 1.3 million deaths in 2013 alone

(Photo: HIV-infected T-cells under high magnification, via Getty Images)

Tuberculosis: caused between 1.3 and 1.5 million deaths in 2013

(Photo: Tuberculosis, via Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

Malaria: up to 855,000 deaths in 2013

(Photo: Malarial Parasite inside Red Blood Cell, via Getty Images)

Pneumonia: results in approx. 4 million deaths per year

(Photo: Microphotograph of diplococcus, bacterium responsible for pneumonia, via Getty Images)

Creuztfeldt-Jakob Disease: 100% fatal

(Photo: Creuztfeldt-Jakob Disease, via Getty Images)

Middle East respiratory syndrome: 41% fatal

(Photo: Getty Images)

Rabies: up to 100% fatal if left untreated

(Photo: Brain of a rabies patient showing negri bodies in the cerebellum, via Getty Images)

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