Cambridge Analytica whistleblower reveals shocking claim his predecessor was poisoned and police bribed

 

  • Christopher Wylie says Cambridge Analytica "don't care whether or not its legal as long as it gets the job done."
  • He paints a picture of a lawless organisation seeking to disrupt elections around the world.
  • He says an offshoot of the company distributed videos of dismembered people in an attempt to intimidate Nigerian voters.
  • He reveals shocking claim that his predecessor was poisoned and that police were bribed not to investigate.


LONDON — The whistleblower at the center of the Cambridge Analytica scandal has revealed shocking claims that his predecessor was murdered in a Kenyan hotel room and that police were bribed not to investigate.

Christopher Wylie, whose allegations blew open the scandal involving the Donald Trump presidential campaign and the official Brexit campaign, painted a picture of a company involved in illegal activity around the globe as he addressed a British parliamentary committee on Tuesday.

Wylie said his predecessor Dan Muresan, was poisoned after "a deal went sour."

"People suspected he was poisoned in his bedroom," Wylie said, adding that Kenyan police had been "bribed not to enter his hotel room for 24 hours."

Wylie added that the claims were merely "speculation" he had heard from others inside the company and that he had no proof of the allegations.

"What I heard was that he was working on some kind of deal of some sort, I'm not sure what kind of deal it is.

"But when you work for senior politicians in a lot of these countries you don't actually make money in the electoral work, you make money in the influence brokering after the fact - and that a deal went sour."

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A man fixes posters depicting Cambridge Analytica's CEO Alexander Nix behind bars, with the slogan 'Our Data Not His. Go Straight To Jail' to the entrance of the company's offices in central London on March 20, 2018. The European Parliament on Tuesday invited Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg to speak following revelations that a firm working for Donald Trump's US presidential campaign harvested data on 50 million users. Facebook has faced worldwide criticism over the claims that Cambridge Analytica, the UK data analysis firm hired by Trump's 2016 campaign, harvested and misused data on 50 million members. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 20: In this photo illustration the logo of the strategic communication company 'Cambridge Analytica' is seen on the screen of an iPhone in front of a computer screen showing a Facebook logo on March 20, 2018 in Paris, France. Cambridge Analytica is accused of collecting the personal information of 50 million users of the Facebook social network without their consent and would have used it to develop software to predict and influence voter voting during the campaign American election according to the New York Times and the Guardian. Facebook share price fell by more than 5% Monday shortly after the opening of Wall Street. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 20: A protester called Heiko Khoo sticks posters of Alexander Nix behind bars onto the windows of the offices in a demonstration against Cambridge Analytica on March 20, 2018 in London, England. PHOTOGRAPH BY Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images (Photo credit should read Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man films Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, for a Facebook live cast as he speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, arrives at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man wheels storage crates from the building that houses the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
People walk past the building housing the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
People walk past the building housing the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Alexander Nix, CEO of Cambridge Analytica arrives at the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man films Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, for a Facebook live cast as he speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 19: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), March 19, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped over 330 points on Monday. Shares of Facebook dropped nearly 7 percent after news broke that analytics firm Cambridge Analytica was able to collect information on 50 million people's Facebook profiles without their consent. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 20: In this photo illustration the logo of the strategic communication company 'Cambridge Analytica' is seen on the screen of an iPhone on March 20, 2018 in Paris, France. Cambridge Analytica is accused of collecting the personal information of 50 million users of the Facebook social network without their consent and would have used it to develop software to predict and influence voter voting during the campaign American election according to the New York Times and the Guardian. Facebook share price fell by more than 5% Monday shortly after the opening of Wall Street. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 19: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), March 19, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped over 330 points on Monday. Shares of Facebook dropped nearly 7 percent after news broke that analytics firm Cambridge Analytica was able to collect information on 50 million people's Facebook profiles without their consent. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
HOLBORN, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 20: Chief executive of Cambridge Analytica Alexander Nix arrives at the office near Holborn on March 20, 2018 in Holborn, England. PHOTOGRAPH BY Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images (Photo credit should read Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
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He added: "Again, this is what I've been told, so I'm not saying this as a matter of fact, but people suspected that he was poisoned in his hotel room."

In remarkable testimony, Wylie painted a picture of a lawless organization that had dealt with hacked material, illegal data and the use of intimidation techniques to win elections.

He said that Cambridge Analytica had little concern for the law, saying "they don't care whether or not its legal as long as it gets the job done."

He said that Aggregate IQ, which he labelled a "shell company" of Cambridge Analytica, had been involved in sending violent and intimidating videos to voters in Nigeria in an attempt to swing an election.

The videos allegedly showed people who were "dismembered had their throats cut, bled to death in a ditch and burnt alive."

Wylie added that "Aggregate IQ, which received 40 percent of vote leave's funding, also worked on projects that involved hacked material and kompromat and distributing violent videos of people being bled to death to intimidate voters and this is the company that played an incredibly pivotal role in politics here.

Illegal activity

He said the company were pivotal in disrupting elections around the globe.

"It is what modern day colonialism looks like," he told the MPs.

Of the company's involvement in the Vote Leave campaign, he said that it "did not pass the smell test," and had definitely been "illegal."

"Aggregate IQ had been used as a proxy money laundering vehicle... so they could overspend," he said.

He said the campaign, which was led by Dominic Cummings, who was the former aide to the environment secretary Michal Gove, had helped change the British constitution through Brexit, based on a "fraud."

He also dismissed earlier claims from Cambridge Analytica to the committee that they had not used Facebook data, saying the testimony or executives had been "exceptionally misleading and... dishonest".

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