Police are investigating multiple suspicious packages sent to US military bases

  • At least two suspicious packages sent to military bases around Washington, DC were discovered on Monday.
  • One package reportedly contained potentially explosive material.
  • The FBI is investigating the origin of the packages.

Multiple suspicious packages were sent to military bases around Washington, DC on Monday, according to a law-enforcement official cited in a CNN report.

Scanning machines detected suspicious materials inside the mailed packages.

The National Defense University at Fort McNair received at least one package containing potentially explosive material at 8:30 a.m. local time, according to CNN.

Army officials also confirmed that Fort Belvoir, Virginia also received a package that "tested positive for black powder and residue," according to US Army spokesman Michael Howard. An X-ray reportedly indicated a "suspected GPS" and an "expedient fuse" were attached.

Both of the packages were rendered safe and no injuries were reported, Army officials told CNN. The FBI has since taken custody of the packages for further investigation.

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Deadly package explosions in Texas
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Deadly package explosions in Texas
The doorway of a home that was hit with a fatal parcel bomb on March 2, 2018 is seen boarded-up in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz
Isaac Machado hides behind his hat against his mother Delores just outside the scene of an explosion. Police investigators are at the home where a 17-year-old boy was killed and a woman injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Police and FBI officers guards the scene of an explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
An FBI agent exits her car after arriving at the scene of an explosion near north Galindo street. Police investigators are at the home where a 17-year-old boy was killed and a woman injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Katelyn Ferguson, 20, gives an interview outside her home, up the street from where a woman was injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
An FBI agent walks towards the crime scene after exiting her car, arriving at the scene of an explosion near north Galindo street. Police investigators are at the home where a 17-year-old boy was killed and a woman injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Austin Fire Department personnel attend the scene of a package explosion in the 6700 block of Galindo Street in east Austin, Texas, U.S. March 12, 2018. Austin Fire Department/Handout via REUTERS. ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
An FBI agent exits her car after arriving at the scene of an explosion near north Galindo street. Police investigators are at the home where a 17-year-old boy was killed and a woman injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Isiah Guerrero, 15, gives an interview to the media in the neighbourhood of the scene of an explosion. Police investigators are at the home where a 17-year-old boy was killed and a woman injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Police chief Brian Manley speaks during a news conference near the scene where a woman was injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
The doorway of a home that was hit with a fatal parcel bomb on March 2, 2018 is seen boarded-up in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Jon Herskovitz
Police and federal agents walk away from a news conference near the scene where a woman was injured in a package bomb explosion in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 12, 2018.REUTERS/Sergio Flores
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Federal officials sad they did not believe the packages were sent by Mark Anthony Conditt, the suspect in the Austin, Texas, bombings who killed himself after a weeks-long bombing spree in March that killed two people and wounded five, NBC News reported.

Other military installations received suspicious packages this year. In late February, 11 people fell ill and were treated for symptoms that included nosebleeds and burning sensations after an envelope containing an unknown substance was opened at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Virginia.

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