Parkland high school students prep for the March for Our Lives

Survivors of the Florida school shooting rallied in Washington Friday ahead of an anti-gun demonstration expected to draw up to 50,000 to the nation’s capital.

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School met with lawmakers and called for stricter gun laws in a dizzying day of pre-march events.

Demitri Hoth captured the urgency of the student-led movement to end gun violence in a morning news conference on Capitol Hill.

“America: We are your future. Why won't you protect us?” Hoth said.

Saturday’s March for Our Lives rally is the culmination of an extraordinary push by Marjory Stoneman Douglas students to galvanize public opinion against the National Rifle Association and the politicians it funds.

New York is among several major U.S. cities poised to host satellite rallies in a display of solidarity.

The students quickly became the face of the anti-gun violence movement following the shooting in Parkland that killed 17 students and staffers on Feb. 14.

RELATED: Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School: 
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Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida
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Vigils held after deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida
People attend a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Students mourn during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A woman lights a candle during a vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Residents attend a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A man reacts during a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Daniel Journey (C), an 18-year-old senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, attends a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at his school, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. Journey said he lost two friends he had known and grown up with since they were seven years old in the shooting. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A handwritten note to a lost friend is surrounded by candles and flowers at a candlelight vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A student places a candle with other tributes at a vigil the day after a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Mourners react during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People attend a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Mourners react during a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
A student rests his head against his mother as they attend a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
People attend a candlelight vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, in Parkland, Florida, U.S. February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Students mourn at a community prayer vigil for victims of yesterday's shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, at Parkridge Church in Pompano Beach, Florida, U.S., February 15, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
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On social media and in a series of public events around the country, the teen activists have kept up a relentless campaign for stricter gun laws, including a ban on assault-style rifles and high-capacity magazines.

“Let us pray with our legs, let us march in unison to the rhythm of justice, because I say enough is enough,” Hoth said at the rally, surrounded by lawmakers and other students.

Washington-bound buses carrying scores of teens rolled out from Florida and other states across the south and midwest Friday.

“We’re not going to stop,” Stoneman Douglas senior Skyler Tauman said before boarding a bus bound for the capital.

“We’re not going to stop until there’s a change, because it’s ridiculous.”

Some of those already in Washington gathered at the Newseum for a panel discussion by Stoneman Douglas student journalists.

Others planned to attend an evening vigil at the National Cathedral and a concert headlined by Fall Out Boy.

“This is a time for action. We need to support the Parkland teens, and kids across the country,” Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz said in a statement.

“We have their backs, and we must demand our lawmakers do more to end this gun violence crisis.”

Among the bold-faced names who joined the morning rally were former U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords, who was shot in the head in 2011, and her husband, former astronaut Mark Kelly.

“What’s really exciting is they’re not going to be students very long, they’re going to be voters,” Kelly said, according to CNN.

The event also drew students from outside of Florida.

Keshon Newman, a high schooler from Chicago, recalled the death of his oldest stepbrother who was shot and killed two years ago.

“In Chicago, it's important for you to know that gun violence has become a tragic way of life, which shouldn't be the normal way of life,” Newman said.

“No, we don't have random mass shootings. We have daily shootings.”

RELATED: 25 fatal school shootings since Columbine: 

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25 fatal school shootings since Columbine
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25 fatal school shootings since Columbine

April 20, 1999 - Columbine High School 

Photo Credit: Reuters

Nov. 20, 1999 - Deming Middle School, New Mexico 

(photo by Joe Raedle)

 February 29, 2000 - Buell Elementary School, Michigan 

Photo Credit: Reuters 

May 26, 2000 - Lake Worth Middle School, Florida 

Photo Credit: Reuters 

March 5, 2001 - Santana High School, California 

Photo Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake MB/RCS

April 25, 2003 - Red Lion Area Junior High School, Pennsylvania

Photo Credit: Reuters 

September 24, 2003 - Rocori High School, Minnesota 

Photo Credit: Getty 

March 21, 2005. Red Lake High School, Minnesota

REUTERS/John Gress 

November 8, 2005 - Campbell County Comprehensive High School, Tennessee 

Photo Credit: Getty 

 Aug. 24, 2006 - Essex Elementary School, Vermont

 Photo Credit: Getty 

September 29, 2006 - Weston High School, Wisconsin 

(Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

October 2, 2006 - West Nickel Mines School, Pennsylvania 

(Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

January 5, 2011 - Millard South High School, Nebraska 

Photo Credit: Getty

February 27, 2012 - Chardon High School, Ohio

REUTERS/Aaron Josefczyk 

December 14, 2012 - Sandy Hook Elementary, Connecticut 

 (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

October 21, 2013 - Sparks Middle School, Nevada. 

(Photo by David Calvert/Getty Images)

December 13, 2013 -  Arapahoe High School, Colorado

REUTERS/Rick Wilking 

June 10, 2014  - Reynolds High School, Oregon

(Photo by Natalie Behring/Getty Images)

October 24, 2014 -  Marysville-Pilchuck High School, Washington

REUTERS/Jason 

February 12, 2016 - Independence High School, Arizona 

Photo Credit: Getty 

September 28, 2016 - Townville Elementary, South Carolina

(Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

April 10, 2017 - North Park Elementary School, California 

 (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

September 13, 2017 - Freeman High School, Washington

Photo Credit: Getty 

January 23, 2018 - Marshall County High School, Kentucky

REUTERS/Harrison McClary

February 14, 2018 - Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, Florida

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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