San Francisco to become first major US city to ban fur sales

Fur sales are one signature away from being outlawed in San Francisco after the city’s Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution on Tuesday.

The ordinance, which is expected to be signed into law by the city’s mayor, would make San Francisco the first major U.S. city to impose such a ban.

Fur sales have been outlawed in Berkeley, California, since 2017 and West Hollywood, California, since 2013.

The ban, which would go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019, will not apply to second-hand stores and charities. It would extend to online purchases from individuals and businesses within the city.

Stores would have until January 2020 to sell off their inventory of fur apparel and accessories purchased or ordered before Tuesday’s vote, Fox News reported.

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Common myths about animals debunked
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Common myths about animals debunked

MYTH: Beaver butt secretions are in your vanilla ice cream and other foods.

You've probably heard that a secretion called castoreum, isolated from the anal gland of a beaver, is used in flavorings and perfumes.

But castoreum is so expensive, at up to $70 per pound of anal gland (the cost to humanely milk castoreum from a beaver is likely even higher), that it's unlikely to show up in anything you eat.

In 2011, the Vegetarian Resource Group wrote to five major companies that produce vanilla flavoring and asked if they use castoreum. The answer: According to the Federal Code of Regulations, they can't. (The FDA highly regulates what goes into vanilla flavoring and extracts.)

It's equally unlikely you'll find castoreum in mass-marketed goods, either.

(Photo via Getty Images)

Sources: Business InsiderVegetarian Resource GroupFDANY Trappers Forum

MYTH: Dogs and cats are colorblind.

Dogs and cats have much better color vision than we thought.

Both dogs and cats can see in blue and green, and they also have more rods — the light-sensing cells in the eye — than humans do, so they can see better in low-light situations.

This myth probably comes about because each animal sees colors differently than humans.

Reds and pinks may appear more green to cats, while purple may look like another shade of blue. Dogs, meanwhile, have fewer cones — the color-sensing cells in the eye — so scientists estimated that their color vision is only about 1/7th as vibrant as ours.

Sources: Today I Found OutBusiness Insider

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Humans evolved from chimpanzees.

Chimps and humans share uncanny similarities, not the least of which is our DNA — about 98.8% is identical.

However, evolution works as incremental genetic changes add up through many generations. Chimps and humans did share a common ancestor between 6 and 8 million years ago but a lot has changed since then.

Modern chimps evolved into a separate (though close) branch of the ape family tree.

Sources: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural HistoryAmerican Museum of Natural History

(Photo by John Foxx/Getty Images)

MYTH: Humans evolved from chimpanzees.

Lemmings do not commit mass suicide.

During their migrations, or if they wander into an area they are unfamiliar with, they sometimes do fall off cliffs.

No one knows exactly when the myth started, but a 1958 Disney video called "White Wilderness," which won an Oscar for best documentary feature, has emerged over the years as the likeliest suspect.

Sources: Business InsiderAlaska Department Of Fish And Game

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Bats are blind.

Being "blind as a bat" means not being blind at all.

While many use echolocation to navigate, all of them can see.

Source: USA Today

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Ostriches hide by putting their heads in the sand.

Ostriches do not stick their heads in the sand when threatened. In fact, they don't bury their heads at all.

When threatened, ostriches sometimes flop on the ground and play dead.

Source: San Diego Zoo

(Photo by Ken Canning via Getty Images)

MYTH: People get warts from frogs and toes.

Frogs or toads won't give you warts, but shaking hands with someone who has warts can.

The human papillomavirus is what gives people warts, and it is unique to humans.

Source: WebMD

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Sharks can smell a drop of blood from miles away.

This one is a big exaggeration. Jaws is not coming for you from across the ocean if you bleed in the water.

Shark have a highly enlarged brain region for smelling odors, allowing some of the fish to detect as little as 1 part blood per 10 billion parts water — roughly a drop in an Olympic-size swimming pool.

But it the ocean is much, much, much bigger and it takes awhile for odor molecules to drift. On a very good day when the currents are favorable, a shark can smell its prey from a few football fields away — not miles.

Source: American Museum of Natural History

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Giraffes sleep for only 30 minutes a day.

This one is a big exaggeration. Jaws is not coming for you from across the ocean if you bleed in the water.

Shark have a highly enlarged brain region for smelling odors, allowing some of the fish to detect as little as 1 part blood per 10 billion parts water — roughly a drop in an Olympic-size swimming pool.

But it the ocean is much, much, much bigger and it takes awhile for odor molecules to drift. On a very good day when the currents are favorable, a shark can smell its prey from a few football fields away — not miles.

Source: American Museum of Natural History

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: There are bugs in your strawberry Frappuccino.

This one used to be true — but not anymore.

Before April 2012, Starbucks' strawberry Frappuccino contained a dye made from the ground-up bodies of thousands of tiny insects, called cochineal bugs or Dactylopius coccus.

Farmers in South and Central America make a living harvesting (and pulverizing) the bugs that go into the dye. Their crushed bodies produce a deep red ink that is used as a natural food coloring, which was "called cochineal" red but is now called "carmine color."

Starbucks stopped using carmine color in their strawberry Frappuccinos in 2012. But the dye is still used in thousands of other food products — from Nerds candies to grapefruit juice. Not to mention cosmetics, like lovely shades of red lipstick.

Sources: Business Insider, CHR Hansen, AmericanSweets.co.ukFoodFacts.comLA Times

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Sharks don't get cancer.

Back in 2013, researchers reported a huge tumor growing out of the mouth of a great white shark, and another on the head of a bronze whaler shark.

And those aren't the only cases of shark cancers: Other scientists have reported tumors in dozens of different shark species.

The myth that sharks don't get cancer was reportedly created by I. William Lane to sell shark cartilage as a cancer treatment.

Sources: Journal Of Cancer ResearchLiveScience

(Photo Pieter De Pauw via Getty Images)

MYTH: Goldfish can't remember anything for longer than a second.

Goldfish actually have pretty good memories.

They can remember things for months, not seconds like many people say.

Source: ABC News

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Humans got HIV because someone had sex with a monkey.

The human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, almost certainly didn't jump to humans through human-monkey sex.

Based on the virus' genetic similarity to a strain of simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV, that infects chimpanzees, most experts think the virus jumped to humans through hunting primates for bush-meat food.

This interaction may have led to blood-to-blood contact — perhaps through an open cut on the hunter — and the transfer of a new strain that could silently infect people.

Sources: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives In MedicineAvert

(Photo via Getty Images)

MYTH: Any shark that stops swimming will suffocate and die.

You often hear sharks can breathe only when swimming pushes water over their gills.

That's true of a lot of sharks, but many others — like bottom-dwelling nurse sharks — can pump oxygen-rich water over their gills without swimming.

All sharks lack swim bladders, however, so if they stop swimming they will sink to the bottom. Luckily a shark's body is incompressible and rapid descents or ascents don't harm them.

Source: American Museum of Natural History

(Photo via Getty Images)

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City Supervisor Katy Tang, who sponsored the ban, heralded its passage while stressing the ethics against fur farms.

“Fur factory farms are violent places for animals where they are gassed, electrocuted, poisoned and injured for the sole purpose of creating clothing and accessories,” Tang said in a statement. “It is unconscionable that San Francisco would continue to allow these types of products to be sold, and we must set the example for other cities across the country and the globe to join us in banning fur apparel.”

San Francisco City Supervisor Katy Tang, who sponsored the fur sale ban, expressed hope that the law will set an example for other cities. Minks are seen at a fur farm in Belarus. 

In a social media post, she also celebrated the decision by a number of prominent fashion designers not to use fur in their products. Donatella Versace announced the decision last week. GucciGiorgio Armani, Michael KorsJimmy Choo and Stella McCartney also have fur bans.

“Profiting off of the literal backs of animals is not right and we will no longer tolerate animal cruelty in the city of St. Francis!” Tang posted on Facebook, referring to the patron of animals that the city was named after.

The ordinance received support from the Humane SocietyPeople for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and Direct Action Now.

 

Anyone found violating the law would face a $500 penalty per item, per day.

Local business owners have meanwhile expressed concern about the law’s effect on their sales.

The city has estimated the ban will cost retailers roughly $10 million a year in lost sales, though retailers have said that figure will be four times higher, ABC 7 reported.

Such discontent was expressed in the city’s fashion district of Union Square, which features an estimated 30 fur-selling retailers.

“This is big business for us in Union Square. This will seriously impact us,” Karen Flood, executive director of the Union Square Business Improvement District, told CBS San Francisco.

“It should be a citywide public vote, it shouldn’t be decided by the Board of Supervisors,” Skip Pas, CEO of West Coast Leather, which sells fur-trimmed items but mostly leather, told The Associated Press.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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