Maryland and Washington DC summon President Trump in a lawsuit alleging that he's violating the Constitution

  • President Donald Trump received a summons in a lawsuit involving the attorneys general of Maryland and Washington, DC.
  • The lawsuit alleges Trump is violating the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution.


President Donald Trump was issued a summons in a lawsuit filed by the attorneys general for both Maryland and Washington, DC, alleging he is violating the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution.

The summons came as the suit was expanded to include his personal capacity as a businessman, WAMU reported Wednesday.

The Emoluments Clause bars public officials from receiving gifts or cash from foreign governments, and ethics experts and lawmakers have repeatedly raised concerns over the patronage of Trump's properties by foreign government officials. Trump, who passed along his business to his two adult sons and a top Trump Organization executive, maintains ties to the business. He did not fully divest from his business as experts had hoped.

Trump pledged to donate all profits at his hotels from foreign government officials to the Treasury. The Trump Organization recently announced that money was donated last month, though it did not provide receipts of how much money was donated.

48 PHOTOS
President Trump's January 2018 approval ratings by state
See Gallery
President Trump's January 2018 approval ratings by state

Alabama - 63 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Alaska - 48 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Arkansas - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Arizona - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Connecticut - 39 percent

Source: Morning Consult

California - 36 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Colorado - 41 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Delaware - 41 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Delaware - 50 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Delaware - 41 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Hawaii - 30 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Iowa - 43 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Illinois - 37 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Idaho - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Indiana - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Kansas - 50 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Kentucky - 55 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Louisiana - 57 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Maine - 40 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Massachusetts - 32 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Michigan - 42 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Minnesota - 41 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Mississippi - 42 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Missouri - 42 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Montana - 41 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Nebraska - 51 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Nevada - 47 percent

Source: Morning Consult

New Hampshire - 43 percent

Source: Morning Consult

New Jersey - 40 percent

Source: Morning Consult

New Mexico - 38 percent

Source: Morning Consult

New York - 39 percent

Source: Morning Consult

North Dakota - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Ohio - 46 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Oklahoma - 55 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Oregon - 37 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Pennsylvania - 46 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Rhode Island - 37 percent

Source: Morning Consult

South Carolina - 51 percent

Source: Morning Consult

South Dakota - 53 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Tennessee - 56 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Texas - 51 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Utah - 46 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Vermont - 30 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Virginia - 45 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Washington - 36 percent

Source: Morning Consult

West Virginia - 59 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Wisconsin - 42 percent

Source: Morning Consult

Wyoming - 60 percent

Source: Morning Consult

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The attorneys general argue in the suit that Trump's refusal to cut ties with his businesses led to foreign officials directly paying his company. The lawsuit additionally alleges that Maryland and Washington, DC, have lost out on business opportunities as a result of foreign officials instead choosing to spend money at Trump properties.

A federal judge tossed out a similar lawsuit earlier this year. The judge questioned whether action from Congress would be better to settle the emoluments issue, rather than the judiciary.

Trump's lawyers have three weeks to respond to the summons, WAMU reported.

NOW WATCH: HENRY BLODGET: The NRA's extremism hurts gun owners, NRA members, and America

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Former official accuses Donald Trump Jr. of pushing 'blatantly illegal' project in India

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.