President Trump touts major GOP victories in special election

President Trump boasted Republicans are undefeated in recent congressional races — leaving out one messy, high-profile election.

“The Republicans are 5-0 in recent Congressional races, a point which the Fake News Media continuously fails to mention. I backed and campaigned for all of the winners. They give me credit for one,” Trump tweeted Sunday morning.

He then wondered if that would change Tuesday if Rep. Rick Saccone is elected to a House seat in Pennsylvania.

While Republicans have fared well in special elections over the last year, the Alabama Senate special election didn’t go over well for the GOP.

RELATED: Roy Moore on Senate election day in Alabama

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Roy Moore on Senate election day in Alabama
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Roy Moore on Senate election day in Alabama
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore rides his horse after voting in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
"Make America Great Again" hats lie on a table at Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore rides away on his horse after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
A saxophonist entertains the guests gathered for Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore emerges to speak to the media after voting at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Supporters perform the Pledge of Allegiance at Republican U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore's election night party in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S. December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Republican candidate for U.S. Senate Judge Roy Moore walks his horses after voting in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks to the media after he cast his ballot in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., December 12, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Judge Roy Moore ties his horse to a fence as he arrives to vote at the Gallant Volunteer Fire Department in Gallant, Ala., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Roy Moore, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate from Alabama, arrives on horseback to a polling location in Gallant, Alabama, U.S., on Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017. Democrat Doug Jones and Moore made their election eve pitches to Alabama voters in settings that evoked the cultural and political divide that's come to define the two parties in modern America. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MONTGOMERY, AL - DECEMBER 12: Mike Tate holds his son, Seth Tate, as he and his family await the arrival of Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore for his election night party in the RSA Activity Center on December 12, 2017 in Montgomery, Alabama. Mr. Moore is facing off against Democrat Doug Jones in the special election for the U.S. Senate. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore (L) and his wife Kayla ride their horses to the polling station to vote in Gallant, AL, on December 12, 2017. The state of Alabama holds a closely-watched special election for US Senate featuring Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is endorsed by President Donald Trump despite being accused of molesting teenaged girls. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Republican Senatorial candidate Roy Moore (C) departs on his horse, Sassy, at the polling station after voting in Gallant, AL, on December 12, 2017 The state of Alabama holds a closely-watched special election for US Senate featuring Republican candidate Roy Moore, who is endorsed by President Donald Trump despite being accused of molesting teenaged girls. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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Republican Roy Moore, who had Trump’s support amid sexual misconduct allegations, lost the December race to Democrat Doug Jones, flipping the deeply red state.

Several women came forward to accuse Moore, 70, of misconduct when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.

Trump defended Moore, however, and noted he’d denied the allegations.

The commander-in-chief had previously backed Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed to temporarily fill the Alabama seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Trump threw his support behind Moore after the former judge bested Strange in a September run-off.

On Sunday, Trump also took a victory lap over poll numbers he said were better than President Obama’s at the same point of his tenure.

“More Rasmussen and others have my approval ratings at around 50%, which is higher than Obama, and yet the political pundits love saying my approval ratings are “somewhat low.” They know they are lying when they say it. Turn off the show - FAKE NEWS!” he also tweeted Sunday.

A Rasmussen poll released Feb. 27 put Trump’s approval rating at 50%, which was seven points higher than Obama’s exactly eight years earlier.

Rasmussen’s daily poll has since dropped, however, with one from Friday putting Trump’s approval rating at 44% — the same share Obama got eight years to the day earlier.

A Marist poll conducted last week also found Trump’s job approval was at 42%, the highest since his January 2017 inauguration, with 50% disapproving of his tenure.

Other surveys released last week put the numbers even lower.

Quinnipiac University and Monmouth University’s polls, both issued last Wednesday, each put Trump’s approval rating at 39% with more than half saying they don’t like the job he’s doing.

That’s on par with a recent Gallup poll, which also found 39% of registered voters thought the President was doing a good job.

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