President Trump pats himself on the back for plan to meet with Kim Jong Un

President Trump praised his own diplomatic prowess on Saturday in a series of tweets about his plan to meet with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un.

Trump says China is glad he’s seeking a diplomatic solution to the long-running crisis on the Korean peninsula rather than “going with the ominous alternative.”

Trump spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping Friday after the unexpected announcement that he was willing to meet with Kim face to face.

The meeting with Kim will take place by May, a historic decision — made by Trump alone — that has drawn criticism from some corners of the diplomatic world.

Trump has told confidants recently that he wants to be less reliant on his staff, believing they often give bad advice, and that he plans to follow his own instincts, sources told The Associated Press.

RELATED: US-North Korea relations escalate in 1968

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US-North Korea relations escalate in 1968
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US-North Korea relations escalate in 1968
(Original Caption) 12/23/1968-Pammunjom, South Korea- Commander Lloyd Bucher, (L) captain of the captured U.S. intelligence ship, 'Pueblo,' leaves a press conference at a base camp near Pammunjom following his and his crew's release from North Korea after eleven months of captivity. Bucher is accompanied by U.S. Navy Public Information Officer, Captain Vince Thomas, (center), and a military policeman.
Commander Lloyd E. Bucher (left, back to the wall), commanding officer of the USS Pueblo, a Navy ship captured by North Korea in the Sea of Japan in 1968, answers questions during a naval court of inquiry. January 24, 1969. His counsel, E. Miles Harvey and Captain James E. Keyes, sit at a nearby table (right). (Photo by Nord Petersen/Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images)
PYONGYANG, NORTH KOREA - APRIL 20: North Korean navy ratings guard the USS Pueblo, an American spy ship, on the river Taedong in central Pyongyang 16 April 2001. The ship was attacked and captured in January 1968 and the crew held for 11 months. It has now become a symbol of a new anti-US propaganda battle. According to North Korean state media, growing numbers of people visit the ship to show their anger at US policy toward the communist state. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read TIM WITCHER/AFP/Getty Images)
Crew members of the US Navy spy ship 'USS Pueblo' cross the Bridge of No Return between North and South Korea, after their release into US custody, 23rd December 1968. They had been seized by North Korean forces on 23rd January of the same year. Official US Navy Photo by PH2 T. K. Reynolds, USNR. (Photo by Pictorial Parade/Archive Photos/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) Comdr. Lloyd Bucher, the Pueblo's captain, appears at a press conference in Pyongyang, North Korea, 9/12/68. At the press conference, members of the Pueblo's crew explained the ship's mission and described its capture. The newsfilm from which these pictures were made was shot by the North Korean news agency.
(Original Caption) Major General Pak Chung Kuk, North Korean Army, across table from Rear Admiral John V. Smith, U.S. Navy, during 262nd meeting of the Armistice Commission.
Korean Guard looks out window with binoculars. | Location: Pamunjom, Korea.
(Original Caption) President Johnson confers with Defense Secretary McNamara during a meeting of the National Security Council at the Executive Mansion 1/24, in this photo released by the White House. The Council discussed the seizure on the high seas of the USS Pueblo by North Korea.
(Original Caption) As the news came in that President Johnson had ordered 14,787 Air Force and Navy Reservists to active duty January 25th, William D. Jackson of Brooklyn (right) entered the US Air Force recruiting station at Times Square and talked about enlisting. Chatting with him is Technical Sgt. Steven L. Ramirez. The United States called, January 25th, for an urgent meeting of the United Nations Security Council to consider 'the grave situation' arising from the seizure of the intelligence ship 'Pueblo' by North Korea.
Algerian Ambassador to the United nations Tewfik Bouattoura (left) listens during a UN Security Council meeting addressing the international inicdent involving North Korea's capture of an alleged American spy boat, the USS Pueblo (AGER-2), New York, New York, late January 1968. (Photo by Al Fenn/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
The U.S.Aircraft carrier ENTERPRISE, 75,700 tons, the world's largest warship which carries about 100 planes, and which is reported to be sailing towards North Korea following the seizure of America's spy ship 'Pueblo' in international waters. (Photo by PA Images via Getty Images)
Officers and crew of the United States Navy ship USS Pueblo being led away after being captured by North Korean forces in international waters in the Sea of Japan during the Vietnam War.
(Original Caption) Senator J. William Fulbright (D-Arkansas), Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, following a 3-hour meeting of his committee 1/24, said a decision on whether to order a full scale investigation into the Tonkin Gulf attack had been postponed. Fulbright said he felt the Administration should 'be very careful' in its response to North Korea's seizure of the USS Pueblo.
NORTH KOREA - JANUARY 01: North Korea. Discovery of weapons and bodies of a United Nations commando force which entered illegally into North Korea. (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)
(Original Caption) 1/2/1968-Along the Western Truce Front, Korea- U.S. troops manning the western tip of 151-mile Korean truce front have recently completed a 15-mile fence as part of a new security system along the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Constructed of iron poles and barbed wire, the fence- it is hoped -will keep North Koreans from smuggling agents into the South.
Commander Lloyd Bucher is greeted by his wife, Cindy, upon returning from captivity in North Korea. He and his crew aboard the USS Pueblo were captured in January 1968. (Photo by James L. Amos/Corbis via Getty Images)
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Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Friday that the in-the-works meeting between the two leaders is validation of the administration’s hardline approach to the rogue nation.

A mix of sanctions and Trump’s combative rhetoric have hammered Kim’s government into discussing “denuclearization,” Sanders said.

Trump said on Twitter that “Kim Jong Un talked about denuclearization with the South Korean Representatives, not just a freeze.”

Worries persist, however, that the outcome of the talks will fall short of the concerns of neighboring countries like Japan, which has insisted that Pyongyang completely abandon its nuclear and missile development.

Tokyo had wanted a commitment on that by Kim to be a precondition for talks.

Takahashi Kawakami, a professor at Tokyo’s Takushoku University, told Reuters that three possible scenarios lay ahead: that Pyongyang agrees to denuclearize, that it agrees on a nuclear freeze, or that it goes back to missile launches.

“Of those I see the second as the most likely, with Japan’s calls for continued pressure sidelined,” Kawakami said.

RELATED: Countdown to a standoff -- A timeline of tension with North Korea

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Countdown to a standoff: A timeline of tension with North Korea
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Countdown to a standoff: A timeline of tension with North Korea

Jan. 6, 2016:

After four years in power, Kim Jong Un says his country can produce a hydrogen bomb, the first step toward a nuclear weapon that could target the United States. The nation tests a device, but Western experts are not convinced it is a genuine hydrogen bomb.

Feb. 7, 2016:

North Korea sends up a satellite. The United States calls this a disguised test of an engine powerful enough to launch an ICBM.

March 9, 2016:

North Korea claims it can miniaturize a nuclear device to fit onto a missile.

June 23, 2016:

North Korea says it has successfully tested an intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM), with a range of 2,000 to 3,400 miles. Kim Jong Un claims the country can now attack "Americans in the Pacific operation theater," including the territory of Guam.

Sept. 9, 2016:

North Korea conducts its fifth and largest nuclear test on the anniversary of the country's founding. It says it has mastered the ability to mount a warhead on a ballistic missile.

April 15, 2017:

North Korea reveals a new ICBM design, displaying the missiles at a military parade to mark the birthday of founding leader Kim Il Sung. Within three months, the missiles are tested.

July 4, 2017:

North Korea tests an ICBM for the first time, saying it can launch a missile that can reach the continental United States. The missile, Hwasong-14, is tested again three weeks later, this time in a night launch.

Aug. 8, 2017:

North Korea's army threatens to fire missiles towards Guam in an "enveloping fire." The message comes hours after President Donald Trump warns Pyongyang that it will be "met with fire and fury" if North Korea does not stop threatening the United States.

Aug. 23, 2017:

North Korea publishes photographs of Kim beside a diagram of what appears to be a new ICBM. Weapons experts say it will be more powerful than the missiles tested by Pyongyang in July, and could have Washington and New York within range.

Aug 29, 2017:

North Korea fires an intermediate range missile over northern Japan, prompting warnings to residents to take cover. The missile falls into the Pacific Ocean, but sharply raises tensions in the region.

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The region has been on edge over the past year as Trump engaged in a sophomoric war of words Kim and North Korea ramped up its nuclear and missile tests.

While Trump did not expand on what the “ominous alternative” could be, in the past he has threatened Kim with “fire and fury like the world has never seen.”

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters after a phone call with Trump that Japan and the United States would continue to be “together 100 percent” and that he’d meet Trump in Washington in April.

Trump tweeted Saturday that Abe “is very enthusiastic about talks with North Korea.”

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