A US consular agency in Mexico is closed over a 'security threat'

The U.S. has shut down a consular agency in a popular resort town in Mexico over a "security threat."

The U.S. Embassy in Mexico announced Wednesday the consular agency in Playa del Carmen will be closed until further notice and that U.S. government employees are barred from traveling there. 

The embassy didn't say what the security threat is. But media outlets noted an explosion on a ferry at Playa del Carmen last month injured over two dozen people.

And one week ago, authorities discovered undetonated explosives on another ferry operated by the same company.

RELATED: Scenes of violence in Mexico

17 PHOTOS
Scenes of the violence devastating Mexico
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Scenes of the violence devastating Mexico
TOPSHOT - A grandson of Mexican journalist Carlos Dominguez Rodriguez -murdered on January 13 in the state of Tamaulipas- mourns over his coffin during the funeral at the cemetery in the community of Nuxco in the municipality of Tecpan de Galeana, Guerrero state, Mexico on January 17, 2018. Dominguez, who became the first journalist killed in Mexico in 2018, had been working in the local newspaper 'Diario de Nuevo Laredo' until a couple of months ago. Mexico is considered one of the most dangerous countries in the world to practice journalism, with more than 200 journalists killed since 2000. / AFP PHOTO / FRANCISCO ROBLES (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO ROBLES/AFP/Getty Images)
Relatives of Mexican journalist Carlos Dominguez Rodriguez -murdered on January 13 in the state of Tamaulipas- carry his coffin upon arrival at the cemetery in the community of Nuxco in the municipality of Tecpan de Galeana, Guerrero state, Mexico on January 17, 2018. Dominguez, who became the first journalist killed in Mexico in 2018, had been working in the local newspaper 'Diario de Nuevo Laredo' until a couple of months ago. Mexico is considered one of the most dangerous countries in the world to practice journalism, with more than 200 journalists killed since 2000. / AFP PHOTO / FRANCISCO ROBLES (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO ROBLES/AFP/Getty Images)
ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUALS COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Forensic technicians work at a crime scene where three men were gunned down by unknown assailants, according to local media, in the municipality of Tlaquepaque, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, Mexico January 10, 2018. REUTERS/Fernando Carranza TEMPLATE OUT
Money packages are detected by Mexican Navy Gamma-ray equipment in a passenger bus at a checkpoint on the road between Reynosa and San Fernando, in Tamaulipas state, in this undated handout photo released by SEMAR Mexico's Navy on January 9, 2018. SEMAR Mexico's Navy/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
A forensic technician stands next to her vehicle as policemen work at a crime scene where unknown assailants gunned down people at a garage in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, January 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Relatives stand next to the coffin of slain lawmaker Saul Galindo of the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) during a mass in Guadalajara, Mexico December 29, 2017. REUTERS/Fernando Carranza
Relatives of slain persons react at a crime scene where their loved ones were gunned down by unknown assailants at a garage in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, January 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Relatives hold posters with images of some of the 43 missing Ayotzinapa College Raul Isidro Burgos students during a march to mark the 38th month since their disappearance in the state of Guerrero, in Mexico City, Mexico November 26, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero
State policemen patrol near a tire shop, which according to local media is the crime scene of a quadruple homicide, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Relatives of a victim react outside a tire shop, which according to local media is the crime scene of a quadruple homicide, in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Relatives of missing women react next to wooden crosses at El Navajo creek, where the bodies of several women were found, during a ceremony to mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women in Praxedis G. Guerrero, on the outskirts of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, November 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
People react near at a crime scene where a man lies dead after being killed by unknown assailants outside a building in Chilpancingo, Guerrero state, Mexico November 15, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Guerrero policemen are seen during the arrest of a member of the Regional Coordinator of Community Authorities (CRAC) after a series of clashes that left at least 11 people dead at La Concepcion village, Acapulco municipality, in Guerrero state, Mexico, on January 7, 2018. At least 11 people were killed and 30 arrested during armed clashes among civilians, community guards and police in a rural area of Acapulco, in southern Mexico, the Guerrero government confirmed. / AFP PHOTO / FRANCISCO ROBLES (Photo credit should read FRANCISCO ROBLES/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of police forces and investigators guard a crime scene where six people were machine-gunned by unknown men at a business in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua state on December 6, 2017. Since 2006, the wave of violence linked to drug trafficking has left more than 196,000 dead and 30,000 missing in Mexico, according to official figures that do not specify how many of these victims are related to organized crime. / AFP PHOTO / HERIKA MARTINEZ (Photo credit should read HERIKA MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Police officers stand guard as they carry out inspections at a checkpoint after 13 people were killed in battles between rival gangs in two states in central and western Mexico, in Uruapan, in the state of Michoacan, Mexico, September 13, 2017. REUTERS/Alan Ortega
Mirna Medina, founder of "Rastreadoras de El Fuerte" a group that searches for missing persons, excavates with other members at a site where they found the skeletal remains of her son Roberto Corrales Medina, in Ocolome village, El Fuerte, Sinaloa state, Mexico, August 26, 2017. The remains of Corrales were discovered by "Rastreadoras de El Fuerte" on July 14, 2017 and delivered to forensic authorities which confirmed the identity this weekend, according to local media. Picture taken August 26, 2017. REUTERS/Jesus Bustamante
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