Former Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg dropped some outrageous claims during an interview blitz on the Russia investigation

  • Former top Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg said he will not be cooperating with special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.
  • Nunberg's interviews on NBC and CNN on Monday went off the rails at times, as he grappled with a subpoena from Mueller and dished out harsh words for some of Trump's top advisers.
  • He also made some bold accusations about Trump, suggesting that, as a candidate, he may have known more about Russia's attempts to influence the US election than he originally let on.

Sam Nunberg, a former top adviser to President Donald Trump, gave several cable-news interviews on Monday about a subpoena he received from special counsel Robert Mueller, the man in charge of the Russia investigation.

Some of those interviews went off the rails, including one with CNN host Jake Tapper.

Nunberg was ordered to turn over emails and other communications related to Trump and nine other people for Mueller's probe into Russian interference in the 2016 US election.

Nunberg called the Mueller's request "absolutely ridiculous" and said he would not cooperate with a "witch hunt" that could harm conservative provocateur Roger Stone — his "mentor" and a former Trump adviser.

"I'm not cooperating, arrest me," Nunberg said. "I'm going to be the first one in history to flat out say, 'I'm not going.'"

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Members past and present of President Trump's inner circle
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Members past and present of President Trump's inner circle
Hope Hicks: Former White House Director of Strategic Communications
Melania Trump: Wife to President Trump and first lady of the United States
Gary Cohn: Former Director of the U.S. National Economic Council
Michael Flynn: Former National Security Advisor, no longer with the Trump administration
Ivanka Trump: First daughter and presidential adviser
Gen. John Kelly: Former Secretary of Homeland Security, current White House chief of staff
Steve Bannon: Former White House chief strategist, no longer with the Trump administration
Jared Kushner: Son-in-law and senior adviser
Kellyanne Conway: Former Trump campaign manager, current counselor to the president
Reince Priebus: Former White House chief of staff, no longer with the Trump administration
Anthony Scaramucci: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Sarah Huckabee Sanders: White House press secretary
Donald Trump Jr.: First son to President Trump
Sean Spicer: Former White House press secretary, soon to be no longer with the Trump administration
Jeff Sessions: U.S. attorney general
Steve Mnuchin: Secretary of Treasury
Paul Manafort: Former Trump campaign chairman
Carter Page: Former foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign
Omarosa Manigault: Former Director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison
Jason Miller: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Mike Dubke: Former White House communications director, no longer with the Trump administration
Stephen Miller: Trump senior policy adviser
Corey Lewandowski: Former Trump campaign manager
Eric Trump: Son to President Trump
Rex Tillerson: Former Secretary of State
Sebastian Gorka: Former deputy assistant to the president in the Trump administration, no longer in his White House role
Roger Stone: Former Trump campaign adviser, current host of Stone Cold Truth
Betsy DeVos: U.S. Education Secretary
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During his phone interview with Tapper, Nunberg stressed why he decided not to cooperate with Mueller: "I'm spending a lot of money on legal fees," he said. "A lot of other people are."

Nunberg also noted that he would have to spend "80 hours" looking for all the documents Mueller requested: "I shouldn't have to spend that much time, I shouldn't have to go back down to a grand jury."

But his interview quickly took wings as he dropped several anecdotes about current and former members of Trump's inner circle.

Though Nunberg's comments have already raised eyebrows, he has been known to plant false stories in the media.

In November 2017, he admitted to making up a viral story that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie fetched McDonald's for then-candidate Donald Trump.

"The sad reality is that it was believable," Nunberg said as he laughed.

Nunberg made more claims during his interview blitz on Monday:

On President Donald Trump:

"Donald Trump caused this, because he's an idiot," Nunberg said referring to the Russia investigation. "He decided to give an interview to Lester Holt, the day after he fired James Comey, and then he decided to have Russians in the Oval Office. You'll have to explain to me because I'll never understand it."

"I'm not going to be able to explain that to you Sam," Tapper replied with a concerned look.

"No, nobody will," Nunberg said.

Though Nunberg said during an interview with MSNBC's Katy Tur that he believes Trump's campaign had not colluded with the Russian government, he hinted that Mueller may have found other incriminating charges: "I think they may. I think that he may have done something during the election, but I don't know that for sure," he said.

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Former Trump campaign volunteer Carter Page
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Former Trump campaign volunteer Carter Page
One-time advisor of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
One-time advisor of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
One-time advisor of U.S. president-elect Donald Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 02: Carter Page, walks away after speaking to the media after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The committee conducting an investigation into Russia's tampering in the 2016 election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - DECEMBER 12, 2016: Carter Page, Global Energy Capital LLC Managing Partner and a former foreign policy adviser to U.S. President-Elect Donald Trump, makes a presentation titled ' Departing from Hypocrisy: Potential Strategies in the Era of Global Economic Stagnation, Security Threats and Fake News' during his visit to Moscow. Artyom Korotayev/TASS (Photo by Artyom Korotayev\TASS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 02: Carter Page, former foreign policy adviser for the Trump campaign, speaks to the media after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The committee conducting an investigation into Russia's tampering in the 2016 election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - DECEMBER 12, 2016: Carter Page, Global Energy Capital LLC Managing Partner and a former foreign policy adviser to U.S. President-Elect Donald Trump, makes a presentation titled ' Departing from Hypocrisy: Potential Strategies in the Era of Global Economic Stagnation, Security Threats and Fake News' during his visit to Moscow. Artyom Korotayev/TASS (Photo by Artyom Korotayev\TASS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 02: Carter Page, former foreign policy adviser for the Trump campaign, speaks to the media after testifying before the House Intelligence Committee on November 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. The committee conducting an investigation into Russia's tampering in the 2016 election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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On Carter Page, Trump's former foreign-policy adviser and a key figure in Mueller's investigation:

Nunberg called Page a "scumbag" and accused him of "colluding with the Russians."

"I think that Carter Page is a weird dude," Nunberg said. "I don't think he should have been involved in that campaign."

On White House communications director Hope Hicks:

Nunberg had harsh words for White House communications director Hope Hicks, who resigned on Wednesday and is expected to leave the administration soon.

Nunberg claimed he would refuse to hand over communications he had with people he "despises," as he put it. One of those of people, he said, is Hicks.

Nunberg also accused Hicks of having an affair with Corey Lewandowski, Trump's first campaign manager.

Page Six reported in May 2016 that Hicks and Lewandowski were seen having a "public shouting match" on a Manhattan street

On White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders:

Nunberg also had sharp words for White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders' who commented on Nunberg's public statements. Sanders said on Monday: "I definitely think he doesn't know that for sure because he's incorrect," Sanders said, referring to some of the claims Nunberg made about the Trump campaign. "As we've said many times before there was no collusion with the Trump campaign. Anything further on what his actions are? He hasn't worked at the White House so I certainly can't speak to him or the lack of knowledge he clearly has."

Nunberg responded to Sanders in an interview with CNN: "If she wants to attack me, I can attack her back," he said.

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White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
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White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
White House spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the press briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, on Octobr 30, 2017. US President Donald Trump has 'no plan or intention' to change special counsel probing possible collusion in Russia's effort to sway the 2016 presidential elections.The assurance came hours after special counsel Robert Mueller announced indictments against three Trump campaign aides, including former chairman Paul Manafort.'The president said last week and I said several times before, there is no intention or plan to make any changes in regards to the special counsel,' White House spokesman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders delivered the press briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, on Monday, June 5, 2017. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 27: Principal Deputy White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during a White House daily briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House June 27, 2017 in Washington, DC. Huckabee Sanders stood in for Press Secretary Sean Spicer to host the daily press briefing. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. September 12, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders (L), White House senior adviser Jared Kushner (C) and White House chief of staff John Kelly (R) look on after US President Donald Trump signed a proclamation calling for a national day of prayer on September 3 for those affected by Hurricane Harvey in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, DC, on September 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds a press briefing at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., May 11, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
THE VIEW - In their first joint interview since the 2016 presidential election, Sarah Huckabee Sanders and her father, former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee will appear on ABC's 'The View,' live WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2017. 'The View' airs Monday-Friday (11:00 am-12:00 pm, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images) SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS, MIKE HUCKABEE
White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders (L) and Thomas Homan, acting director of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency (ICE), hoold a briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 28, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Deputy White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders (L-R) holds the door for Press Secretary Sean Spicer and White House national security advisor H.R. McMaster to speak in the White House briefing room in Washington, U.S., May 16, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, U.S. June 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US Energy Secretary Rick Perry arrives to take the podium from Principal Deputy White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders at the press briefing at the White House in WQashington, DC, on June 27, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
(l-r), White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders looks on, while Scott Pruitt, EPA Administrator, delivered the press briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, on Monday, June 5, 2017. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the daily press briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington, DC, May 10, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 9: White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks to reporters outside the West Wing after President Donald J. Trump terminated FBI Director James Comey, at the White House in Washington, DC on Tuesday, May 09, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 10: Reporters and members of the media as questions as Deputy White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, DC on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 11: White House deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, speaks during press briefing on May 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sanders fielded questions about President Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 19: White House Chief of Staff John Kelly (L) waits to speak as press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders introduces him during a White House briefing October 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. Kelly spoke about the process of the military notifying family members of a death, his own son's death Afghanistan, and the controversy surrounding the news of U.S. President Trump's phone calls to Gold Star families. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
White House Press Secretary Sarah H. Sanders takes questions during a briefing at the White House October 6, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 05: White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders answers questions during a briefing at the White House October 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sanders responded to a number of questions related to the recent shooting in Las Vegas, and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House press secretary, takes questions during a White House press briefing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. President�Donald Trump�and his spokeswoman on Friday repeatedly declined to clarify the cryptic remark�he made while posing for photos with military leaders that the gathering might represent 'the calm before the storm.' Photographer: Chris Kleponis/Bloomberg via Getty Images
White House Press Secretary Sarah H. Sanders (L) and Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert talk outside the White House September 11, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
THE VIEW - In their first joint interview since the 2016 presidential election, Sarah Huckabee Sanders and her father, former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee will appear on ABC's 'The View,' live WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2017. 'The View' airs Monday-Friday (11:00 am-12:00 pm, ET) on the ABC Television Network. (Photo by Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images) SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS, MIKE HUCKABEE, SUNNY HOSTIN, JEDEDIAH BILA
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders holds the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House spokesperson Sarah Huckabee Sanders speaks during the press briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, on Octobr 30, 2017. US President Donald Trump has 'no plan or intention' to change special counsel probing possible collusion in Russia's effort to sway the 2016 presidential elections.The assurance came hours after special counsel Robert Mueller announced indictments against three Trump campaign aides, including former chairman Paul Manafort.'The president said last week and I said several times before, there is no intention or plan to make any changes in regards to the special counsel,' White House spokesman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. / AFP PHOTO / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 30: White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders answers reporters' questions during a news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House October 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his ex-business partner Rick Gates turned themselves in to federal authorities Monday in relation to the special counsel's investigation into Russian influence in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 30: White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders answers reporters' questions during a news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House October 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. Former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his ex-business partner Rick Gates turned themselves in to federal authorities Monday in relation to the special counsel's investigation into Russian influence in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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