Graham urges GOPers to reach across party lines on gun control

With gun legislation at the forefront of recent debate, Senator Lindsey Graham weighed in Sunday, saying both parties would “suffer” if they did not address the issue.

“If we don’t take this up and Democrats don’t work with us, we’ll all suffer and we should,” Graham said on CBS's "Face the Nation." 

In the interview with CBS, Graham urged Republicans to reach across party line when it comes to the gun issue, saying that Congress would be affected if they don’t address problems most Americans are facing. 

The remarks come after activists and members of Congress have spoken out for stricter gun laws after the mass school shooting in Parkland, Florida that left 17 people dead. 

Graham also called on President Trump, who hosted a bipartisan group last week for televised meetings about guns, to put forward a proposal to Congress. 

“Propose something, Mr. President," Graham said. "And I think Republicans have an obligation to work with Democrats to make it law if we can."

RELATED: President Trump's bi-partisan meeting with lawmakers on gun reform

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President Trump's bi-partisan meeting with lawmakers on gun reform
U.S. President Donald Trump announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Flanked by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) U.S. President Donald Trump meets with bi-partisan members of Congress to discuss school and community safety in the wake of the Florida school shootings at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump receives a Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School bracelet from Congressman Ted Deutch (D-FL) as Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) passes it over during a meeting with bipartisan members of Congress to discuss school and community safety in the wake of the Florida school shootings at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Chairman, CEO and President of Nucor John Ferriola and U.S. Steel CEO Dave Burritt flank U.S. President Donald Trump as he announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens as U.S. President Donald Trump meets with bi-partisan members of Congress to discuss school and community safety in the wake of the Florida school shootings at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and press secretary Sarah Sanders listen as U.S. President Donald Trump announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump holds a meeting where he announced that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump meets with bi-partisan members of Congress to discuss school and community safety in the wake of the Florida school shootings at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) speaks as Senator John Cornyn (R-TX), C, and U.S. President Donald Trump listen during a bi-partisan meeting with members of Congress to discuss school and community safety in the wake of the Florida school shootings at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
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