Pulse shooting trial begins for Omar Mateen's widow Noor Salman

Jury selection begins Thursday for the trial against Noor Salman — the widow of Pulse nightclub shooter Omar Mateen — over her alleged role in the 2016 massacre in Orlando.

Salman is accused of helping her husband plan out the shooting at the Orlando gay nightclub, along with obstructing justice in the investigation.

The 31-year-old widow was not with Mateen during the June 2016 shooting, during which he killed 49 people before being fatally shot by police.

But federal prosecutors are trying to prove she knowingly helped a terrorist organization by scouting locations with Mateen for him to shoot up, then deflect police attention away from him for the mass murder.

“What would make people more upset, an attack on downtown Disney or a club?” court documents quote Mateen asking his wife.

RELATED: A look back at the Pulse nightclub shooting

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An aerial view shows the Pulse gay night club after a mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S. June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Friends and family members embrace outside the Orlando Police Headquarters during the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Friends and family members embrace outside the Orlando Police Headquarters during the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius
Friends and family members embrace outside the Orlando Police Headquarters during the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 12: FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub where Omar Mateen allegedly killed at least 50 people on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The mass shooting killed at least 50 people and injuring 53 others in what is the deadliest mass shooting in the country's history. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 12: FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub where Omar Mateen allegedly killed at least 50 people on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The mass shooting killed at least 50 people and injuring 53 others in what is the deadliest mass shooting in the country's history. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 12: FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub where Omar Mateen allegedly killed at least 50 people on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The mass shooting killed at least 50 people and injuring 53 others in what is the deadliest mass shooting in the country's history. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Friends and family members embrace outside the Orlando Police Headquarters during the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse night club, where as many as 20 people have been injured after a gunman opened fire, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Demetrice Naulings sobs outside the Orlando Police Headquarters where police are interviewing witnesses in the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius
Concerned friends and family of victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting wait outside of the Orlando Police Department on Sunday, June 12, 2016. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Ray Rivera, DJ at the Pulse nightclub, is consoled by a friend outside of the Orlando Police Department on Sunday, June 12, 2016. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Police stand in front of one of the houses that officials indicated was connected to the Orlando shooter in Port St. Lucie, Florida, U.S. June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
An aerial view shows the Pulse gay night club after a mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S. June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Police stand in front of one of the houses that officials indicated was connected to the Orlando shooter in Port St. Lucie, Florida, U.S. June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 12: FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub where Omar Mateen allegedly killed at least 50 people on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The mass shooting killed at least 50 people and injuring 53 others in what is the deadliest mass shooting in the country's history. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
ORLANDO, FL - JUNE 12: FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub where Omar Mateen allegedly killed at least 50 people on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The mass shooting killed at least 50 people and injuring 53 others in what is the deadliest mass shooting in the country's history. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Officers arrive at the Orlando Police Headquarters during the investigation of a shooting at the Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman, in Orlando, Florida, U.S June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Steve Nesius
An aerial view shows the Pulse gay night club after a mass shooting in Orlando, Florida, U.S. June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Orlando Police Chief John Mina and other city officials answer the media's questions about the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Kolczynski
Police lock down Orange Avenue around Pulse nightclub, where people were killed by a gunman in a shooting rampage in Orlando, Florida June 12, 2016. REUTERS/Kevin Kolczynski
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Mateen declared his support for ISIS in a 911 phone call during the shooting, and the terror group claimed responsibility in the attack.

Salman also knew Mateen bought an semi-automatic AR-15 rifle, saw him buy ammunition for it and saw him leave their Fort Pierce apartment with the rifle on the night of the attack, prosecutors claim.

She even suggested a cover story for that evening.

"If ur mom calls say nimo invited you out an noor wants to stay home," she allegedly texted Mateen.

The FBI has identified “Nemo” as Mateen’s friend he used as an alibi while having an affair.

Along with aiding and abetting, she also faces an obstruction of justice charge.

She told FBI agents Mateen owned just one gun, that he wasn’t an extremist and wasn’t active on social media.

Salman also denied Mateen had the assault-style rifle on him when leaving the apartment that night, prosecutors said.

Those statements, along with her actions with Mateen leading up to the horrific shooting, are likely to come into focus as the trial progresses.

The trial itself is slated to last about three weeks, USA Today reported, following a week of jury selection.

An Orlando grand jury indicted Salman in January 2017, but she’d taken off for her native California by that time. She was later arrested in San Francisco and brought back to Florida.

RELATED: Omar Mateen

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Orlando gay nightclub mass shooting suspect Omar Mateen, 29 is shown in this undated photo. Orlando Police Department/Handout via Reuter ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Salman is the only person charged in one of the deadliest mass shootings in U.S. history, and she faces life behind bars if convicted on both counts.

The government also wants to seize about $30,000 in hard assets Mateen amassed leading up to the shooting.

The gunman opened a bank account in her name and spent $25,000 within 10 days of the mayhem. That should’ve raised flags for Salman, prosecutors claim.

Salman’s written confession — a lynchpin for prosecutors — is likely to come into question.

At least one medical evaluation of Salman during the year she’s been in custody suggested she wasn’t mentally fit and was coerced into a false confession, local ABC affiliate WFTV reports.

Salman’s lawyers also argued she gave the statement after relentless questioning while her lawyer wasn’t present.

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