Couple finds bazooka round while making home renovations

NEWPORT NEWS, Virginia (WTKR) -- A couple got a big surprise when they knocked down a wall while renovating their home Monday evening.

According to fire officials, they found an old bazooka round in the wall of the home.

The homeowner said it was in the wall in the back of the garage area.

The couple immediately called the fire department and bomb squad. They have lived there about a year and a half.

Based on the condition of the ordnance, the bomb squad deemed it to be completely safe. There were no injuries.

The bomb squad stored it in a bomb box and will take it to Fort Eustis Tuesday.

RELATED: World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven

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World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven
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World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

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