E-cigarette vapor tested positive for lead and arsenic

Electronic cigarette use is on the rise, and so are concerns about how safe they are.

A new study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspective, found that notable levels of potentially toxic metals, including lead and arsenic, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in aerosols vapers inhale.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health reached conclusions after analyzing e-cig devices of 56 users. A significant number of the devices generated aerosols with potentially unsafe levels of lead, chromium, manganese and nickel.

“It’s important for the FDA, the e-cigarette companies and vapers themselves to know that these heating coils, as currently made, seem to be leaking toxic metals — which then get into the aerosols that vapers inhale,” the study’s senior author, Ana María Rule, told USA Today.

Further research is planned to better understand the possible health impact of e-cigs.

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UNITED STATES - JUNE 16: Jody Reavis, an employee of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a unit of Reynolds American Inc., smokes a cigarette during a demonstration against a proposal to raise cigarette taxes in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, June 16, 2009. North Carolina, which grows the most tobacco in the U.S. and is home to Reynolds and Lorillard Inc., is one of at least 25 states where legislators are considering an increase in cigarette taxes to cover budget shortfalls. Reynolds is the second-largest U.S. tobacco company with brands such as Camel, Pall Mall, Kool, Winston, and Doral. (Photo by Jim R. Bounds/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 16: Victoria Gordon, an employee of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., a unit of Reynolds American Inc., smokes a Salem cigarette during a demonstration against a proposal to raise cigarette taxes in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, June 16, 2009. North Carolina, which grows the most tobacco in the U.S. and is home to Reynolds and Lorillard Inc., is one of at least 25 states where legislators are considering an increase in cigarette taxes to cover budget shortfalls. Reynolds is the second-largest U.S. tobacco company with brands such as Camel, Pall Mall, Kool, Winston, and Doral. (Photo by Jim R. Bounds/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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