The US will reportedly deploy attack drones to South Korea after the Olympic Games

  • The US will reportedly send attack drones capable of killing North Korean leaders to South Korea within coming months.
  • Preparations for the drones are complete.
  • Earlier this week US forces confirmed military drills with South Korea will resume after the Olympic Games. Details are expected to be announced around the same time the drones arrive.


Not only will the US and South Korea recommence military drills once the Winter Olympic Games wrap up, but the US will deploy attack drones to the Korean Peninsula.

Twelve attack drones that are capable of zeroing in on North Korean leaders and military targets will be deployed in March or April, Chosun Ilbo reported this week. The Gray Eagle/MQ-1Cs will be based at the US air base in Kunsan.

Chosun reported a hangar has already been built for the drones and support facilities and personnel have arrived at the air base.

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A U.S. airman guides a U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone as it taxis to the runway at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File photo
A U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone flies over Creech Air Force Base in Nevada during a training mission May 19, 2016. Picture taken May 19, 2016. REUTERS/Josh Smith
U.S. airmen control a U.S. Air Force drone from a command trailer at Kandahar Air Field, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. Picture taken March 9, 2016. REUTERS/Josh Smith
Three 500-pound bombs wait to be loaded on U.S. Air Force drones at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File Photo
A U.S. airman controls the sensors on a U.S. Air Force drone from a command trailer at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File Photo
A U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone sits armed with Hellfire missiles and a 500-pound bomb in a hanger at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File Photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Air Force ground crew secure weapons and other components of an MQ-9 Reaper drone after it returned from a mission, at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File photo
A U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper drone takes off from Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan March 9, 2016. To match Exclusive AFGHANISTAN-DRONES/ REUTERS/Josh Smith/File Photo
A man walks past a graffiti, denouncing strikes by U.S. drones in Yemen, painted on a wall in Sanaa November 13, 2014. Yemeni authorities have paid out tens of thousands of dollars to victims of drone strikes using U.S.-supplied funds, a source close to Yemen's presidency said, echoing accounts by legal sources and a family that lost two members in a 2012 raid. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: CIVIL UNREST MILITARY POLITICS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Various U.S. military drones are seen at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington September 1, 2015. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
The Navmar Applied Sciences Corp. TigerShark is escorted off the runway after landing during "Black Dart", a live-fly, live fire demonstration of 55 unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, at Naval Base Ventura County Sea Range, Point Mugu, near Oxnard, California July 31, 2015. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Soldiers stand behind of a camera by Unmanned Aerial System 'Shadow' during an official presentation by the German and U.S. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) at the U.S. military base in Vilseck-Grafenwoehr October 8, 2013. The drone has a wing-spread of 6.90 metre, an aircraft speed of about 177 km/h and it's mainly used in Afghanistan. Picture taken October 8. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle (GERMANYMILITARY - Tags: POLITICS) MILITARY)
People gather near the wreckage of a car destroyed by a U.S. drone air strike that targeted suspected al Qaeda militants in August 2012, in the al-Qatn district of the southeastern Yemeni province of Hadhramout February 5, 2013. U.S. drones have launched almost daily raids on suspected al Qaeda militants in Yemen during the past two weeks, and air strikes have aggravated discontent among Yemenis, who say the strikes pose a threat to civilians. REUTERS/Khaled Abdullah (YEMEN - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY SOCIETY)
An X-47B pilot-less drone combat aircraft is launched for the first time off an aircraft carrier, the USS George H. W. Bush, in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Virginia, May 14, 2013. The U.S. Navy made aviation history on Tuesday by catapulting an unmanned jet off an aircraft carrier for the first time, testing a long-range, stealthy, bat-winged plane that represents a jump forward in drone technology. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
A U.S. Navy serviceman (L) prepares to launch an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) with Philippine Navy servicemen aboard a patrol boat during a joint annual military exercise called "Carat" at former U.S. military base Sangley Point in Cavite city, west of Manila June 28, 2013. REUTERS/Erik De Castro (PHILIPPINES - Tags: POLITICS MILITARY)
U.S. Marine Lance Corporal Paxton Force, of Fox Co, 2nd Battalion, 7th Marines Regiment checks T-Hawk, a surveillance drone camera at the Landing Zone of Combat Outpost Musa Qal-Ah in Helmand province, southwestern Afghanistan November 5, 2012. REUTERS/Erik De Castro (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS CIVIL UNREST)
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The Gray Eagle, which has a 18-yard wingspan, can work on a variety of missions including attack, reconnaissance, surveillance and infiltration, as well as provide imagery to ground patrols. Its ability to work in a 248 mile radius means it can fly across nearly all of North Korea.

This isn't the first time the US has sent attack drones to South Korea. In March 2017, the US began deploying attack drones to counter "provocative actions" by North Korea. 

In time since, North Korea launched 11 missiles.

US Forces confirmed on Tuesday that combined military drills will continue "as planned" in South Korea after the Paralympic Games finish in March. It's expected an update will be provided in March or April.

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