The bruise on Gus Kenworthy's hip is horrifying (Photo)

American skier Gus Kenworthy won silver in the 2014 Sochi Games, but wasn’t able to replicate that performance this year in PyeongChang.

When you see the injury he was competing with, you’ll understand his 12th-place finish in the men’s slopestyle final.

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Just a bruised peach.🍑

A post shared by gus kenworthy (@guskenworthy) on

Ouch. The huge bruise you’re looking at is the aftereffects of a massive hematoma (a solid swelling of clotted blood within the tissues) that Kenworthy told USA Today he had to have drained. The details of that process aren’t pretty:

It was disgusting. It also hurt so bad because they didn’t do anything for it. They rubbed a little numbing thing on the skin where the needle was going in, but that was it. Then the actual injection, it was a huge needle because the hematoma was massive. In order to drain it, they had to keep moving the needle around in the skin, and kind of twisting it and pushing it up and down, so that hurt. They didn’t know how much blood they were going to get out of it, so they had to keep switching the cartridge, and it ended up being 140 ccs of blood.

Disgusting, indeed.

Kenworthy, who also competed with a broken thumb, made plenty of headlines despite the fact he did not return to the podium with an Olympic medal.

Kenworthy announced he was gay in a 2015 story with ESPN and has been outspokenin his opposition of the choice of Vice President Mike Pence as the leader of the U.S. delegation. Before his run, he shared a kiss with his boyfriend, Matt Wilkas. It was shown on the NBC broadcast. The two didn’t realize the kiss would be broadcast, but both were glad it was.

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Freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy poses for a portrait at the U.S. Olympic Committee Media Summit in Park City, Utah, U.S. September 25, 2017. Kenworthy listens to pop music while he trains. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Olympian freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy speaks during an event in Times Square to celebrate 100 days from the start of the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Games in South Korea, in New York, U.S., November 1, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy poses for a portrait at the U.S. Olympic Committee Media Summit in Park City, Utah, U.S. September 25, 2017. Kenworthy listens to pop music while he trains. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
PYEONGCHANG-GUN, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 09: Gus Kenworthy and Shaun White of the United States enter the stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at PyeongChang Olympic Stadium on February 9, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea. (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)
PYEONGCHANG-GUN, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 11: United States Freestyle skier Gus Kenworthy answers questions at a press conference at the Main Press Centre during the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games on February 11, 2018 in Pyeongchang-gun, South Korea. (Photo by Ker Robertson/Getty Images)
SNOWMASS, CO - JANUARY 14: Gus Kenworthy #17 competes in the Men's Ski Slopestyle final during the Toyota U.S. Grand Prix on January 14, 2018 in Snowmass, Colorado. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
SNOWMASS VILLAGE, CO - January 14: Freestyle Skier Gus Kenworthy is in Toyota U.S. Grand Prix at Aspen Snowmass. January 14, 2018. (Photo by Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
MAMMOTH, CA - JANUARY 17: Gus Kenworthy trains prior to the qualifying round of the Men's Ski Halfpipe during the Toyota U.S. Grand Prix on on January 17, 2018 in Mammoth, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
COPPER MOUNTAIN, CO - DECEMBER 06: Gus Kenworthy of the United States competes in a qualifying round of the FIS Freeski World Cup 2018 Men's Ski Halfpipe during the Toyota U.S. Grand Prix on December 6, 2017 in Copper Mountain, Colorado. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: (L-R) Figure skater Ashley Wagner, skier Gus Kenworthy and skier Lindsey Vonn take a selfie during the 100 Days Out 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics Celebration - Team USA in Times Square on November 1, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images for USOC)
July 12, 2017; Los Angeles, CA, USA; Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy and partner Matthew Wilkas arrive for the 2017 ESPYS at Microsoft Theater. Mandatory Credit: Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Sports
Gold winner Joss Christensen (C), silver medalist Gus Kenworthy (L) and bronze medalist Nicholas Goepper of the U.S. celebrate during the medal ceremony of the men's freestyle skiing slopestyle finals at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, February 13, 2014. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (RUSSIA - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS SPORT SKIING)
Silver medalist Gus Kenworthy (L) of the U.S. celebrates as his compatriot, gold winner Joss Christensen, watches during the medal ceremony of the men's freestyle skiing slopestyle finals at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, February 13, 2014. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (RUSSIA - Tags: SPORT OLYMPICS SPORT SKIING)
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Kenworthy, who, on top of the silver medal, made a name for himself for adopting a number of stray dogs from Sochi, said he was too afraid to do so during the Sochi Games, which took place before he came out publicly.

“That’s something that I wanted at the last Olympics – to share a kiss with my boyfriend at the bottom – and it was something that I was too scared to do for myself,” Kenworthy said. “And so to be able to do that, to give him a kiss, to have that affection broadcasted for the world is incredible. I think that’s the only way to really change perceptions, break down homophobia, break down barriers is through representation. And that’s definitely not something I had as a kid. I definitely didn’t see a gay athlete at the Olympics kissing their boyfriend. And I think if I had, it would’ve made it a lot easier for me.”

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Sam Cooper is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him or follow him on Twitter!

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