People are collecting glassware that contains uranium

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Vintage Uranium Glass bottles glow under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
Vintage Uranium Glass bottles stand on a table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
The glassware of an Art-Deco Uranium Glass Travel Mini Bar Set glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
An Art-Deco Uranium Glass Travel Mini Bar Set sits on a drawer seen in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A vintage Opalescent Glass salt or pepper shaker glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A vintage Opalescent Glass salt or pepper shaker stands on a table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A Davidson Primrose Pearline Uranium Glass candy dish on a plate glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A Davidson Primrose Pearline Uranium Glass candy dish on a plate is seen in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
Villeroy & Boch Art Nouveau Uranium Glass glassware sits on a table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
A Davidson Primrose Pearline Uranium Glass cake plate glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A strawberry cake sits on a Davidson Primrose Pearline Uranium Glass cake plate in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
The Uranium Glass details of a Cranberry vase glow under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A cranberry vase decorated with Uranium Glass details stands on a side table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A vintage Uranium Glass candle holder glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A vintage Uranium Glass candle holder stands on a table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
An Art Nouveau Uranium Glass table lamp glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
An Art Nouveau Uranium Glass table lamp stands on a bedside table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
Art-Deco Uranium Glass jewellery glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth
Art-Deco Uranium Glass jewellery sits on a chest of drawers in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A fluorescent pearl rosary glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A 1950's fluorescent pearl rosary sits on an Art-Deco burl wood desk in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A Pernod opalex ashtray, a 1950's Gablonz Uranium Glass ring and a 1940's Uranium Glass soda siphon, glow under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A Pernod opalex ashtray, a 1950's Gablonz Uranium Glass ring and a 1940's Uranium Glass soda siphon are seen in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, January 23, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A Bernsdorf Uranium Glass vase glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
Roses stand in a Bernsdorf Uranium Glass vase in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
The dial of a 1950's Swiss made travel alarm clock glows under ultraviolet light in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
A 1950's Swiss made travel alarm clock sits on a bedside table in Wangen an der Aare, Switzerland, February 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth 
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Uranium glass occupies a little-known niche in the collectibles world, whose members appreciate its soft color and distinctive glow, which comes from the uranium added as the glass was created.

The pieces shown here come from the collection of Peter Marti and Markus Berner, who trade in antique glass at a small shop downstairs from their flat in Wangen an der Aare, a town in Switzerland. They discovered the glass about 15 years ago at a Swiss flea market and have been collecting ever since.

Like many uranium glass collectors, they are especially drawn to pearline, which was created by several companies, mostly in Britain, from the end of the 19th century into the 20th.

Yellow pearline is called vaseline, because the shade is similar to the colour of petroleum jelly - until it's exposed to ultraviolet light, when it glows a bright green.

The glass is slightly radioactive, enough to register on Geiger counters. But the levels are about the same as electrical appliances like microwave ovens emit, so they represent no threat to health.

 

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