Rare letter from Albert Einstein surfaces in Chicago ​

CHICAGO (WGN) — In 1939, Albert Einstein wrote "thank you notes" to a few people for helping Jews to escape Nazi Germany, and while historians only knew about two of those letters, a third surfaced in Chicago.

Nearly 80 years after it was penned on June 10, 1939, Enid Bronstein is sharing the letter Einstein wrote to her father, David Finck. A finance man in New York, Finck never met Einstein, but he attracted the physicists' attention after he sponsored many members of the Jewish community so they could flee Nazi Germany for the U.S.

Enid said her father received the letter before the U.S. entered WWII because the Jewish community was "well-aware" of what was happening in Germany. After her father passed away, Enid said she kept the letter in a safe deposit box for 50 years.

"I wanted to keep the letter to show it to my children and grandchildren so that they would get the message that every contribution, no matter how small is important," she said.

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circa 1910: Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955), the German-Swiss-American mathematical atomic physicist and Nobel prizewinner, seen early in his career in a thoughtful pose. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
circa 1920: Physicist and mathematical genius, Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955). (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Picture dated 1931 of German-born Swiss-US physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), author of theory of relativity, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921, playing the violin. (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
1933: German-Swiss-American mathematical physicist Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955). (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
BOSTON - MARCH 18: Celebrated picture dated 18 march 1951, shows German-born Swiss-US physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921, sticking out his tongue at photographers on his 72nd birthday. Germany, the birthplace of Albert Einstein, launches 19 January 2005 a year of international celebrations to mark the 100th anniversary of three of the physicist's four papers that changed the way we view the Universe. (Photo by: ARTHUR SASSE/AFP/Getty Images)
1950: Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955), German-Swiss-American mathematical atomic physicist and Nobel prizewinner, at home in Princeton. (Photo by Doreen Spooner/Keystone Features/Getty Images)
circa 1955: Mathematical physicist Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955) delivers one of his recorded lectures. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
circa 1941: A near-profile of Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955) the German-Swiss-American mathematical atomic physicist and Nobel prizewinner, looking pensive. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
German born American physicist Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955), 1946. (Photo by Central Press/Getty Images)
Portrait taken in 1948 of German-born Swiss-US physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955), author of theory of relativity, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1921. (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
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Enid says that while similar letters have sold for thousands at auction, she decided to donate it to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum so future scholars and historians could share the lessons it contains.

Susan Snyder from the museum says as more survivors pass, the race is on to gather as much as possible and collect first person accounts, making the letter significant because it shows Einstein acknowledging the work done by the Jewish community in America.

"It was an important thing for us because the collection just adds exponentially," Snyder said.

You can see the full letter below.

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