Parents of Republican Senate hopeful max out donations to Democratic opponent

The parents of a Republican Senate hopeful in Wisconsin have maxed out donations to the primary campaign of the Democrat he hopes to unseat.

Just months after Republican Kevin Nicholson announced his bid to run against incumbent Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) in 2018, Nicholson’s own parents donated the legal maximum to Baldwin’s primary campaign, CNN reports.

Nicholson’s parents, Donna and Michael, reportedly donated $2,700 to Baldwin in December 2017. Nicholson had announced in July that he was seeking the Republican nomination for the Senate seat.

12 PHOTOS
Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin
See Gallery
Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 7: Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisc., leaves the Senate Democrats' weekly policy lunch in the Capitol on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: (L-R) U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) chat during a break of a confirmation hearing for Health and Human Services Secretary Nominee Rep. Tom Price (R-GA) January 17, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Price, a leading critic of the Affordable Care Act, is expected to face questions about his healthcare stock purchases before introducing legislation that would benefit the companies. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 02: Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY)(L), speaks while flanked by Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) and Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), during an event to unveil 'A Better Deal On Trade and Jobs', in front of the US Capitol on August 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 02: Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) speaks during an event to unveil 'A Better Deal On Trade and Jobs', in front of the US Capitol on August 2, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 12: U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) speaks with reporters as she arrives for the weekly Senate Democrat's policy luncheon, on Capitol Hill, December 12, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Al Drago/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) (C) speaks during a hearing before the Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee November 15, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The subcommittee held a hearing on 'VA Efforts to Prevent and Combat Opioid Overmedication.' (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 25: Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wisc., speaks during a news conference to discuss President Trump's 'many broken promises to American workers during the first 100 days of his administration' on Tuesday, April 25, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (R-NY) speaks to reporters about the tax reform bill the Senate passed last week, and the possibility of a Government shutdown, at US Capitol on December 5, 2017 in Washington, DC. Also pictured is Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), (L), Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH), and Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI),(R). (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 9: Sens. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., right, and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., conduct a rally on the east lawn of the Capitol to urge Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to hold a vote on the 'Seniors and Veterans Emergency Benefits Act,' March 9, 2016. The legislation would provide a one time payment to seniors, veterans and other SSI recipients who will not get a cost-of-living adjustment this year. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Senator Tammy Baldwin, a Democrat from Wisconsin, during the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., on Thursday, July 28, 2016. Division among Democrats has been overcome through speeches from two presidents, another first lady and a vice-president, who raised the stakes for their candidate by warning that her opponent posed an unprecedented threat to American diplomacy. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, right, is introduced by Senator Tammy Baldwin, a Democrat from Wisconsin, during a campaign event in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, U.S., on Saturday, April 2, 2016. Clinton used Donald Trump's remarks about punishing women who have abortions if the procedure were outlawed to level a double-barreled attack on the Republican front-runner as well as her Democratic rival, Bernie Sanders. Photographer: Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 09: Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), speaks about social security while flanked by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, (D-MA), (R), and a group of senior citizens during a news conference on Capitol Hill, February 9, 2016 in Washington, DC. Senate democrats are urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to bring the 'Seniors and Veterans Emergency Benefits Act' to the floor for a vote. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

“My parents have a different worldview than I do,” Nicholson, a former Democrat, told CNN by way of explanation. 

“It is not surprising that they would support a candidate like Tammy Baldwin who shares their perspective.” 

Democrats have been increasingly nervous about Baldwin’s seat, with the incumbent targeted by an onslaught of outside spending from conservative groups. 

Democratic Party leaders have said the odds remain in Baldwin’s favor, but they’re not going to take the race for granted.

By early January, nine groups had spent more than $4.7 million on ads that attack Baldwin or boost one of the Republicans vying to oppose her, according to her campaign.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.