Trump rolls out $200B infrastructure plan hinged on state, private dollars

The White House unveiled its long-awaited infrastructure plan on Monday, proposing $200 billion in federal spending that it says will ultimately spur a $1.5 trillion investment over the next 10 years.

"We have to rebuild our infrastructure," President Donald Trump said Monday morning. "We're trying to fix roads and bridges that are falling down."

The plan includes $100 billion in "incentives" that would require local and state governments to pony up big bucks or partner with private companies to unlock federal dollars. While the government will judge several criteria when considering whether or not to give out infrastructure dollars, the biggest will be outside funding.

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A look at America's infrastructure
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A look at America's infrastructure
Aaron LaRocca, Chief of Staff of the George Washington Memorial Parkway, shows rusted beams in need of replacement on the draw span of the Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington, U.S., June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Aaron LaRocca, Chief of Staff of the George Washington Memorial Parkway, stands by support beams used to support the counter weight of the draw span of the Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington, U.S., June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Obsolete voltage meters in the draw bridge control room are shown on the Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington, U.S., June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Aaron LaRocca, Chief of Staff of the George Washington Memorial Parkway, looks at a trunnion post that needs replacement on the Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington, U.S., June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Steel beams on the draw span, which needs replacement, are shown on the Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington, U.S., June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Garbage and debris pile up behind the Markland Locks and Dam on the Ohio River in Florence, Indiana, U.S., September 14, 2017. According the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Markland Locks? construction started in March 1956 and the locks were placed in operation in May 1959. Photograph taken at N38�46.464' W84�57.836'. Photo taken September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Construction of the new Olmsted Locks and Dam continues on the Ohio River in Olmsted, Illinois, U.S., September 19, 2017. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Olmsted Locks and Dam will replace locks and dams 52 and 53 and will be operational in 2018. Photograph taken at N37�11.131' W89�04.053'. Photo taken September 19, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo drives a 1955 Chevrolet Corvette with World War II veteran Armando "Chick" Gallela, during a dedication ceremony for the new Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge that is to replace the current Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River in Tarrytown, New York, U.S., August 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Construction equipment fills a portion of Cedar Street during a years-long water main and sewer renovation project under the street in Somerville, Massachusetts, U.S., August 4, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A police officer looks at work crews replacing a bridge over the Massachusetts Turnpike, part of in MassDOT's (Massachusetts Department of Transportation) Commonwealth Avenue Bridge Replacement Project, in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 4, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Work crews work to replace a bridge over the Massachusetts Turnpike, part of in MassDOT's (Massachusetts Department of Transportation) Commonwealth Avenue Bridge Replacement Project, in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 4, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A bicyclist and a driver make their way over steel plates covering a portion of Cedar Street during a years-long water main and sewer renovation project under the street in Somerville, Massachusetts, U.S., August 4, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Firefighters work to fix a leak in the water infrastructure beneath the pavement outside a home in Los Angeles, California, U.S., March 22, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A pothole is pictured on the street of Los Angeles, California February 12, 2016. An estimated 65 percent of U.S. roads are in poor condition, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, with the transportation infrastructure system rated 12th in the World Economic Forum's 2014-2015 global competitiveness report. Picture taken February 12. To match Insight AUTOS-AUTONOMOUS/INFRASTRUCTURE REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
A pothole is pictured on the street of Los Angeles, California February 12, 2016. An estimated 65 percent of U.S. roads are in poor condition, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, with the transportation infrastructure system rated 12th in the World Economic Forum's 2014-2015 global competitiveness report. Picture taken February 12. To match Insight AUTOS-AUTONOMOUS/INFRASTRUCTURE REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 12: A traffic delineator stands in a pothole on July 12, 2017 in Oakland, California. According to a report by WalletHub, roads in San Francisco, Oakland and four other California cities are the worst in the United States. Drivers in San Francisco and Oakland pay an estimated $978 per year to repair vehicle damage from driving on roads with potholes and uneven pavement. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 30: Pedestrians stop and look at a sinkhole caused by a water main break on Amsterdam Avenue, in the Upper West Side section of Manhatten, August 30, 2016 in New York City. Water started flowing Monday night from a broken pipe and crews continued with repairs on Tuesday morning. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 30: Workers observe the site of a water main break that caused a sinkhole on Amsterdam Avenue, in the Upper West Side section of Manhatten, August 30, 2016 in New York City. Water started flowing Monday night from a broken pipe and crews continued with repairs on Tuesday morning. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 30: A woman peers into a sinkhole caused by a water main break on Amsterdam Avenue, in the Upper West Side section of Manhatten, August 30, 2016 in New York City. Water started flowing Monday night from a broken pipe and crews continued with repairs on Tuesday morning. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Potholes are seen at the former site of the General Motors Co. powertrain plant inside the Willow Run airport in Ypsilanti, Michigan, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The Great Lakes state plans to make a test track out of a 330-acre (134-hectare) industrial ghost town near Ypsilanti, where Rosie the Riveter built B-24 bombers during World War II. Photographer: Sean Proctor/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DENVER, CO - MARCH 03: Sidney Oats, of Denver Public Works, patches a pothole at 2nd Ave. and Knox Ct. in Denver, March 03, 2015. The combination of unseasonably warm temperatures followed by freezing cold is responsible for the onslaught of potholes in the Denver area. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
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The proposal sets the stage for unprecedented private investment in public infrastructure, and the president took the opportunity Monday to remind those assembled at the White House of his own private-public success story. As a real estate developer, Trump completed long-stalled renovations on the ice skating rink Central Park in 1986 ahead of schedule and under budget.

Democrats pounced on the plan immediately, pushing back on the outsize role local and private funding would have to play.

“The president’s infrastructure proposal would do very little to make our ailing infrastructure better, but would put unsustainable burdens on our local government and lead to Trump tolls all over the country," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement, referring to the use of tolls by private companies to profit from infrastructure.

In Trump's proposal, another $20 billion will be earmarked for expanding federal loan programs that focus on various kinds of infrastructure, like rail, water and transportation, and for expanding a tax-exempt bond program for private companies.

His administration's proposal also allocates $50 billion for rural infrastructure projects to be distributed as block grants to states, and another $20 billion for "transformative programs" that “have the potential to dramatically improve America’s infrastructure."

Trump said his plan would "return power" to states and local governments.

"Nobody knows more where you want the money to be invested than you guys," he said to the local leaders in attendance, which included Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican, and Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat.

The president pushed the idea of public-private partnerships to fund infrastructure projects in his State of the Union address last month, though NBC News has reported that Trump himself is waffling on the funding idea.

"Every federal dollar should be leveraged by partnering with state and local governments and, where appropriate, tapping into private sector investment — to permanently fix the infrastructure deficit," the president said in his address to Congress.

The White House said Sunday that it would use yet-to-be-announced budget cuts to pay for the program, and acknowledged that this is a starting point for a negotiation with lawmakers. Both parties are likely to see problems with Trump's plan: Democrats are sure to call for more federal investment, while conservatives typically oppose increased federal spending.

In keeping with the president’s campaign promises to cut red tape, the plan also vows to rewrite the regulation and permitting process to speed infrastructure investment, shortening and simplifying the approval process. That includes putting environmental reviews into one agency, shortening the timeline for those reviews to two years.

The president repeatedly interjected complaints about the media during his meeting with local authorities, complaining that the press wouldn't want to talk about infrastructure reform.

"I find it sexy, because I used to be a builder," he said. 

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