A pair of Canadian figure skaters who just won gold at the Olympics had to tone down their 'raunchy' routine because it was like a 'porno'

  • Two Canadian figure skaters decided a move in their routine was too "porno" for the 2018 Winter Olympic games.
  • Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir edited the move from their repertoire when Canada contested the Team Event on Monday.
  • The decision was fully justified as Virtue and Moir helped Canada to a gold medal victory.

 

Two Canadian figure skaters decided to tone down their routine after deciding it was too "porno" for a family-friendly event like the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Figure skating, the first winter sport included in the Olympics, draws on show business elements and combines pace on the skates, elegance and grace, and tricks such as jumps and flicks. Choreography of the routine is therefore important.

For Canadian pair Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, their gold medal hopes in Monday's team event relied on a routine that was less raunchy than the sexually suggestive routines they had used in previous competitions.

Just last month, Moir described one move as a bit "porno." The Toronto Star claimed it could be a "neck straddle" that bordered on a "sex chokehold."

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Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir's figure skating routine
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Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir's figure skating routine
Figure Skating ? Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics ? Team Event Ice Dance Free Dance competition final ? Gangneung Ice Arena - Gangneung, South Korea ? February 12, 2018 - Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada in action. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada compete in the Ice Dance Free Dance during the Figure Skating Team Event on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada compete in the Ice Dance Free Dance during the Figure Skating Team Event on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA FEBRUARY 12, 2018: Ice dancers Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada perform their free dance as part of the figure skating team event at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, at the Gangneung Ice Arena. Valery Sharifulin/TASS (Photo by Valery Sharifulin\TASS via Getty Images)
PYEONGCHANG-GUN, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada compete in the Figure Skating Team Event Ice Dance Free Dance on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA FEBRUARY 12, 2018: Ice dancers Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada perform their free dance as part of the figure skating team event at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games, at the Gangneung Ice Arena. Valery Sharifulin/TASS (Photo by Valery Sharifulin\TASS via Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada compete in the Figure Skating Team Event � Ice Dance Free Dance on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)
Canada's Tessa Virtue and Canada's Scott Moir compete in the figure skating team event ice dance free dance during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 12, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Roberto SCHMIDT (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
Canada's Tessa Virtue and Canada's Scott Moir compete in the figure skating team event ice dance free dance during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 12, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Roberto SCHMIDT (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada skate during the Ice Dance Free Dance section of the Team Event on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 12: Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada skate during the Ice Dance Free Dance section of the Team Event on day three of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Ice Arena on February 12, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. (Photo by Robert Cianflone/Getty Images)
Canada's Tessa Virtue and Canada's Scott Moir competes in the figure skating team event ice dance free dance during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Ice Arena in Gangneung on February 12, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Mladen ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
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Of the "porno" manoeuvre, Moir said: "When we slowed [the routine] down and looked on the video, it wasn’t aesthetically that beautiful of a position. So we wanted to change it, make it a little bit better."

Virtue added that the move "made a statement" and "was different." However, their joint vision for the 2018 Winter Olympics differed from their "edgy" moves from before.

This time, they used "positions that fit a little better."

The decision was fully justified as Virtue and Moir helped Canada to a gold medal in the Olympic Team Event on Monday.

The duo now have four medals each which ties the record for most Olympic medals won by a figure skater.

Canada's gold medal figure skatersGetty Images

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