Poll finds almost no one thinks Trump's military parade is a good idea

President Donald Trump made waves this week as reports emerged that he had asked the Pentagon to work up plans for a massive military parade akin to the type normally seen in countries like Russia and North Korea. 

But according to an informal poll conducted by the Army Times, most people don’t support it.

Nearly 9 in 10, or specifically 89 percent, of the publication readers who responded said the parade is "a waste of money and troops are too busy." Another 11 percent supported the idea, describing it as a "great opportunity to show off U.S. military might."

The Washington Post reported on Tuesday that planning for a military parade is now underway at the behest of the president. 

RELATED: North Korea unveils new weapons at military parade

19 PHOTOS
North Korea unveils new weapons at military parade
See Gallery
North Korea unveils new weapons at military parade
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un applauds during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father, Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Missiles are driven past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and other high ranking officials during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
High ranking military officers cheer as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives for a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
People react as they march past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
TOPSHOT - Korean People's Army (KPA) tanks are displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
Korean People's Army (KPA) soldiers march on Kim Il-Sung squure during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves to people attending a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Military vehicles carry missiles with characters reading "Pukkuksong" during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Members of the Korean People's Army (KPA) ride on mobile missile launchers during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of the country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
An unidentified rocket is displayed during a military parade marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung in Pyongyang on April 15, 2017. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un on April 15 saluted as ranks of goose-stepping soldiers followed by tanks and other military hardware paraded in Pyongyang for a show of strength with tensions mounting over his nuclear ambitions. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)
People carry flags in front of statues of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung (L) and late leader Kim Jong Il during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father, Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A soldier salutes from atop an armoured vehicle as it drives past the stand with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers march and shout slogans during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers attend a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Attendees carry sheets in colours of the national flag of North Korea during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung, in Pyongyang April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
North Korean soldiers, some of them on horses, march during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
Civilian attendees watch North Korean soldiers marching during a military parade marking the 105th birth anniversary of country's founding father Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea, April 15, 2017. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Defense Secretary James Mattis said on Wednesday that President Trump’s desire to hold a military parade is rooted in his "fondness" for the U.S. armed forces. 

"I think we're all aware in this country of the president's affection and respect for the military," Mattis said during a press briefing.

Mattis also noted that he and others have been "been putting together some options" for review. 

SEE MORE: US Navy SEAL who killed Bin Laden thinks military parade is a bad idea

Trump reportedly first mentioned the idea last July after attending the annual Bastille Day parade in Paris, which featured numerous troops and a bevy of military equipment. 

While his inspiration reportedly came from France, there are concerns that a public display of tanks and assorted large weaponry would draw associations with totalitarianism and North Korea. 

Other critics have complained that such a parade would likely come with an immense price tag thanks to the costs of assembling and displaying the military's biggest and most powerful machines.

14 PHOTOS
Russia's Red Square parade
See Gallery
Russia's Red Square parade
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Two Pantsir-SA surface-to-air missile system are seen during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin and Moldovan President Igor Dodon attend the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. Sputnik/Aleksey Nikolskyi/Kremlin via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Two Russian servicemen sit inside a Buk-M2 missile system during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with veterans after the the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Yuri Kochetkov/Pool
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian servicewomen parade during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian servicemen parade with Tigr-M (Tiger) all-terrain infantry mobility vehicles and Kornet-D1 anti-tank guided missile systems during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. Sputnik/Aleksey Nikolskyi/Kremlin via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. EDITORIAL USE ONLY.
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian servicemen stand atop a tank during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - A Yars RS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile system is seen during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Yuri Kochetkov/Pool
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian servicemen parade during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Yuri Kochetkov/Pool
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian President Vladimir Putin waves hand as he attends the Victory Day military parade marking the World War II anniversary at Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin
Moscow - Russia - 09/05/2017 - Russian servicemen parade with tanks during the 72nd anniversary of the end of World War II on the Red Square in Moscow. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The U.S. military budget is far greater than any other country in the world. According to data from 2014, America spent $610 billion on the military -- about 34 percent of the world total, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. By comparison, that's nearly three times higher than China, which came in second place with an estimated $216 billion in spending and more than six times more than Russia, which came in third place with about $84.5 billion in military spending that year.

Critics of the plan have been vociferous in their objection, including Democratic Senator Dick Durbin, who called the possible parade "a fantastic waste of money to amuse the president" and suggested the funds instead be used to "fix military housing, hire more [Veterans Affairs] doctors…or give more flight training time."

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.