Trump sees 'BOMBSHELLS' in FBI texts about Clinton email probe

President Trump turned his Twitter attention on Wednesday to newly released 2016 text messages between a pair of FBI agents that suggest President Obama wanted “to know everything we’re doing.”

“NEW FBI TEXTS ARE BOMBSHELLS!” Trump tweeted late Wednesday morning — around the time the president was scheduled to receive his daily intelligence briefing.

Earlier Wednesday, Fox News posted a story summarizing the texts between Peter Strzok, the deputy assistant director of counterintelligence, and Lisa Page, an FBI attorney, who were reportedly having an affair at the time. The texts were published in an “interim” report by the Senate Homeland Security Committee on the Clinton email investigation.

In one exchange dated Sept. 2, 2016, Strzok and Page discussed drafting talking points for then-FBI Director James Comey, apparently intended for Comey to brief Obama, who “wants to know everything we’re doing.”

In the report, Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, said that the message raises “questions about the type and extent of President Obama’s personal involvement in the Clinton email scandal and the FBI investigation of it.”

However, it’s unclear whether Obama’s purported interest was in the FBI’s investigation of Clinton — or in the Trump campaign. The FBI did not reopen its investigation of Clinton’s emails until later that month. The FBI did, however, have an active counterintelligence investigation into the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russia at that time.

In another exchange cited in the report, Strzok referred to Virginians who voted against Democratic state Senate candidate Jill McCabe — wife of then-FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe — as “ignorant hillbillys (sic).” A day after firing Comey, Trump reportedly asked McCabe, then the bureau’s acting director, who he voted for in the 2016 election. When McCabe declined to say, Trump reportedly called McCabe’s wife a “loser.”

9 PHOTOS
Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe
See Gallery
Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe
Newly installed acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, May 11, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe prepares to testify during the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing on 'World Wide Threats' on Thursday, May 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe prepares to testify during the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing on 'World Wide Threats' on Thursday, May 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: From left, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, and Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, appear during a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Hart Building titled 'World Wide Threats' on May 11, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 11: Andrew McCabe, Acting Director of the FBI after President Trump fired James Comey, speaks during a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Worldwide Threats in Washington, USA on May 11, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 11: A binder containing classified material marked Secret sits on the witness table in front of Andrew McCabe, Acting Director of the FBI after President Trump fired James Comey, before a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Worldwide Threats in Washington, United States on May 11, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 21: Federal Bureau of Investigation Deputy Director Andrew McCabe arrives for a meeting with members of the Oversight and Government Reform and Judiciary committees in the Rayburn House Office Building December 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. McCabe testified before the House Intelligence Committee for ten hours on Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (C) speaks with Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (L) and Acting Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Andrew McCabe (R) during a press conference at the US Department of Justice in Washington, DC, on July 13, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe testifies before the House Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

In previously released text messages, Strzok and Page referred to Trump as an “idiot” and a “loathsome human.”

Both Trump, via Twitter, and the White House seized on those texts, saying they showed bias against Trump by the agents. They worked briefly on Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the Trump campaign’s contacts with Russia, but were taken off the case last year, in what was seen as an effort by Mueller to avoid the appearance of bias.

In a text exchange between the agents on Nov. 8, 2016, Page wrote, “OMG THIS IS F***ING TERRIFYING” — a reference to Trump’s possible victory. After Clinton conceded the election to Trump, Page wrote: “Omg, I am so depressed.”

Johnson said the messages “raise questions about whether personal political bias may have affected the FBI’s inquiry.”

Democrats have dismissed the charges of bias, contending that the texts show little more than gossip among work colleagues.

Read more from Yahoo News:

Read Full Story