Elon Musk just revealed a secret message SpaceX sent to space aboard the cosmic Tesla

Just after SpaceX launched the first flight of its Falcon Heavy rocket on Tuesday, lofting a red Tesla Roadster to deep space, Musk revealed a little secret hidden within the cosmic car. Elon Musk is always one for a nice surprise. 

Musk posted a photo on Instagram displaying a message for any space-faring civilization that may come across the car in the future. The words "made on Earth by humans" are printed on the Tesla's circuit board.

Printed on the circuit board of a car in deep space

A post shared by Elon Musk (@elonmusk) on

The Tesla also comes equipped with a dashboard message reading "don't panic," and a dummy driver named "Starman" who will fly through the solar system in the Tesla for millions, if not billions, of years to come. 

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SpaceX Falcon heavy rocket blasts off from Florida
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SpaceX Falcon heavy rocket blasts off from Florida
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - FEBRUARY 05: The SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket sits on launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center as it is prepared for tomorrow's lift-off on February 5, 2018 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket, which is the most powerful rocket in the world, is scheduled to make its maiden flight between 1:30 and 4:30 p.m. tomorrow. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018.
Vapor rises before the scheduled launch of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
The SpaceX Falcon Heavy takes off from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on February 6, 2018, on its demonstration mission. The world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster to an orbit near Mars. Screams and cheers erupted at Cape Canaveral, Florida as the massive rocket fired its 27 engines and rumbled into the blue sky over the same NASA launchpad that served as a base for the US missions to Moon four decades ago. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket trails smoke after lifting off from historic launch pad 39-A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
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This is far from the first time humans have sent a signpost of our existence out into the universe. 

NASA's two Voyager spacecraft are each carrying a Golden Record, which includes the sounds of Earth as well as a map that explains where we are in space. 

Basically, Starman is in good company. 

The Falcon Heavy — SpaceX's most powerful rocket ever — took flight at 3:45 p.m. ET from Kennedy Space Center. 

The huge rocket is basically three Falcon 9 rockets strapped together and can bring heavy payloads to distant parts of space like the moon or Mars. 

The key to the Falcon Heavy's success will be its reusability. SpaceX hopes to bring back the rocket's three first-stage boosters to Earth after launch, meaning they can use them again for later flights. 

The two side boosters made it back to the landing zones at Kennedy, but SpaceX has yet to reveal the fate of the third booster, which was expected to land on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean.

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