Government shutdown deadline looms as lawmakers try for DACA deal

WASHINGTON — The next short-term government funding bill is set to run out Thursday and Congress is poised to pass a fifth stop-gap funding bill to keep the lights on.

The latest deadline looms as a deal on DACA, which in part forced the last government shutdown, has yet to emerge that will get the support of the White House.

The run up to this congressional-imposed deadline is expected to lack the showdown drama of the last funding date three weeks ago because neither party wants to repeat the three-day government shutdown, but nothing is yet certain as negotiations are still ongoing.

It's the continuation of a pattern of short spurts of government funding to give stalemated congressional leaders more time to work out a variety of issues, including top-line spending levels for the current fiscal year and how any increases in government spending will be paid for, if they will at all.

Thursday is also a critical marker in the debate on DACA. It's the date Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., agreed to give negotiators to come up with an agreement to address Dreamers, the immigrants who came to the U.S. as children with their parents. If no agreement is reached by Thursday, then McConnell agreed to bring up a "shell" bill for the Senate to add to with amendments.

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President Trump and Republicans attend retreat at Camp David
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives with members of the government and Republican leaders to speak to the media following the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway walks in ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump listens to Vice President Mike Pence speaking to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) to speak to the media following the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after speaking to the media after the Congressional Republican Leadership retreat at Camp David, Maryland, U.S., January 6, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
THURMONT, MD - JANUARY 6: (AFP OUT) Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) speaks to the media after participating in meetings with President Donald Trump at Camp David on January 6, 2018 in Thurmont, Maryland. President Trump met with staff, members of his Cabinet and Republican members of Congress to discuss the Republican legislative agenda for 2018. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
THURMONT, MD - JANUARY 6: (AFP OUT) Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to the media after participating in meetings with President Donald Trump at Camp David on January 6, 2018 in Thurmont, Maryland. President Trump met with staff, members of his Cabinet and Republican members of Congress to discuss the Republican legislative agenda for 2018. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
THURMONT, MD - JANUARY 6: (AFP OUT) U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson listens as Republicans take turns speaking to the media at Camp David on January 6, 2018 in Thurmont, Maryland. President Trump met with staff, members of his Cabinet and Republican members of Congress to discuss the Republican legislative agenda for 2018. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
THURMONT, MD - JANUARY 6: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to the press after holding meetings at Camp David on January 6, 2018 in Thurmont, Maryland. President Trump met with staff, members of his Cabinet and Republican members of Congress to discuss the Republican legislative agenda for 2018. (Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers at Camp David in Thurmont, Maryland, January 6, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump, alongside Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis (C) and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (L), speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers and members of his Cabinet at Camp David in Thurmont, Maryland, January 6, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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A group of bipartisan congressional leaders, tasked by President Donald Trump, have been working toward a solution on DACA but appear no closer to agreement.

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., a member of that group, said he's not optimistic that a deal will be reached on DACA before Friday.

But he added on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday: "I don't see a government shutdown coming."

Sens. Chris Coons, D-R.I., and John McCain, R-Ariz., introduced a bipartisan bill Monday that addresses DACA and border security.

Coons said in a conference call with reporters that the legislation is admittedly narrow but that it's a good middle ground and starting point.

He reiterated that Democrats don't support many components in the president's proposal, including an end to family-based immigration and changes to birthright citizenship. And Coons said he doesn't back an idea being floated of giving DACA recipients a one-year extension.

"My concern is that now Senators are saying the fallback position should be almost literally doing nothing like a one-year DACA bill and a one-year border bill. This stands between those two poles," Coons said. "So this is a bill that I think should be our base bill. I don't think we should do anything less than what's in McCain-Coons, and it's my hope that in the next few days of negotiating we will do something more."

The McCain-Coons proposal is similar to a bipartisan bill in the House by Reps. Will Hurd, R-Texas, and Pete Aguilar, D-Calif., that would provide legal status for Dreamers and increase security on the border.

The White House already dismissed the proposal, however, calling it a "non-starter."

"It's worse than Graham-Durbin, and it takes effort to make a bill worse than Graham-Durbin," a senior administration official told NBC News.

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Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA)
Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA)
Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY)
Senator Claire McCaskill (D-MO)
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA)
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand
Rep. John Lewis (D-GA)
U.S. Representative Steny Hoyer (D-MD)
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Graham-Durbin is a proposal that attempts to address the four pillars Trump set forth. It provides a path to citizenship for about 1.8 million people eligible for DACA, allocates $2.8 billion for border security and the president's wall, ends the diversity visa lottery, and prohibits the parents of Dreamers from receiving citizenship but does give them protected legal status.

Trump tweeted Monday that any proposal that doesn't include a wall is "a total waste of time."

Trump told Congress to come up with a legislative solution for Dreamers by March 5 or their protected status will expire. A court, however, has given some reprieve but also added confusion for DACA recipients, ruling that Trump couldn't end DACA.

A bipartisan group of senators, self-named the Commonsense Caucus, of which Coons is a member, continues to meet as well to hammer out consensus on immigration.

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