Pentagon's Defense Logistics Agency loses track of $800 million

The Pentagon appears to be missing hundreds of millions of dollars. 

Politico reports that Ernst & Young recently performed an independent audit of the Defense Logistics Agency and found that there’s apparently no way to account for roughly $800 million in construction spending. It was also determined that the financial management of the department, which serves as the purchasing agent for the Pentagon, seems to lack the means and methods required to accurately track the massive expenditures it handles.

The DLA employs about 25,000 people, and that staff is tasked with processing approximately 100,000 spending requests per day, according to Politico.

In a statement released after the audit, the agency noted it is "first of its size and complexity in the Department of Defense to undergo an audit so we did not anticipate achieving a ‘clean’ audit opinion in the initial cycles."

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One of the meeting rooms where US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and other senior US military officials conduct confidential meetings is seen inside the Pentagon, February 14, 2012, in Washington, DC. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
People walk through a newly-renovated corridor at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A newly-renovated corridor leading to a ramp is seen at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. Ramps were used instead of elevators to connect floors in the original construction of the Pentagon in order to conserve steel. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A memorial to fallen soldiers is seen at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
People sit in the newly-renovated food court at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Department of Defense workers sit in the newly-renovated food court at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A memorial for the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks stands at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. The Sept. 11 attack killed 184 people, including 125 in the building and 59 on American Airlines Flight 77, and destroyed nearly all of the progress on the overhaul of the first wedge. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A newly-renovated corridor leading to a ramp is seen at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. Ramps were used instead of elevators to connect floors in the original construction of the Pentagon in order to conserve steel. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker stands inside the newly-renovated dining room at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
People sit in the newly-renovated food court at the Pentagon in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, July 12, 2011. It took 17 years and $4.5 billion to complete the Pentagon makeover, the first full-scale renovation of one of the world's largest office buildings. Photographer: Rich Clement/Bloomberg via Getty Images
ARLINGTON, VA - May 17: Anzus Corridor in A-Ring in the new Pentagon renovation, Tuesday May 17, 2011. (Photo by Dayna Smith/for the Washington Post)
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DLA also said it will be using the audits to craft “corrective action plans.”

That is similar to the plan of action the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller/Chief Financial Officer), David Norquist, described during an August interview with Defense News

He characterized the audit as a "great opportunity," and said, "Part of my goal is pushing the audit forward so we can get those findings, and then using that process to help drive change."

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Future plans aside, the missing money revelation comes as the Trump administration is reportedly pressing lawmakers to stretch the military’s defense budget beyond the limitations set in existing law.

It is seeking a defense spending allowance of $716 billion for fiscal year 2019, notes The Hill.

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