Newly-discovered species of spider with scorpion-like tail found in amber

A newly-discovered species spider with a scorpion-like tail has been discovered, preserved in amber.

Dating back 100 million years, it lived amid the undergrowth in the rainforests of what is now Myanmar — back when dinosaurs still roamed the earth. 

The spider had fangs, and one specimen measured 2.5 millimeters in length, with its tail stretching nearly three millimeters on its own.

According to research in Nature Ecology & Evolution, the tail — or telson — served as a sort of antenna, likely locating predators or prey.

That sets it apart from today’s spiders — as no known living spider has a long flagellum — though both have spinning organs.

The spider has been dubbed “Chimerarachne” — after the mythical Chimera — because it’s something of a hybrid.

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Spiders weave giant webs in Jerusalem enchanted forest
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Spiders weave giant webs in Jerusalem enchanted forest
Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University's Arachnid Collection, looks onto giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), covering sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A long-jawed spider (Tetragnatha) weaves a spider web over sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University's Archnid Collection, looks onto Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), covering sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University's Archnid Collection looks onto giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), covering sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University's Archnid Collection, looks onto giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), covering sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), cover sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha) weave giant spider webs over sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
Igor Armicach, a doctoral student at Hebrew University's Arachnid Collection, looks onto giant spider webs, spun by long-jawed spiders (Tetragnatha), covering sections of the vegetation along the Soreq creek bank, near Jerusalem November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun
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