Archaeologists find mysterious pool at ancient church in Israel

When summertime rolls around, we all love to hangout by the pool. And it turns out so did some of the folks at an ancient church in Israel.

A massive 1,500-year-old pool was uncovered at Ein Hanya that was built between the 4th and 6th centuries A.D., according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. 

Part of a system of pools, water from it drains through a mysterious fountain adorned with images of nymphs. 

But the pool is generating a lot of buzz because of its size and also the unknown factor of what it was actually used for. 

Archaeologists believe that it is possibly the site where the Ethiopian eunuch was baptized by St. Philip the Evangelist. A key event in the spread of Christianity. 

They also believe the site may have been a royal estate prior to the Byzantine era. 

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Discoveries made by the Israel Antiquities Authority
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Discoveries made by the Israel Antiquities Authority
Archaeologists from the Israeli Antiquities Authority, inspect a cave near a recently discoveread Edomean era structre, at ancient ruins of Amuda, near the town of Beit Guvrin on November 30, 2017. A 2200-year-old (Hellenistic period) structure, possibly an Edomean palace or temple, was uncovered during in archaeological excavations at the site of Horvat Amuda, situated at the heart of a military training area in the Lachish region. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, excavator of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), holds a stamped piece of clay from the First Jewish Temple period which belonged to the 'governor of the city' of Jerusalem, the most prominent local position to be held in Jerusalem of 2700 years ago, and which were excavated at the northwestern part of the Western Wall plaza in Jerusalem's Old City, on January 1, 2018, at he IAA laboratories in Jerusalem. The extraordinary find is a lump of clay, stamped and pre-fired, measures 13 x 15 mm and is 23 mm thick. The upper part of the sealing depicts two figures facing each other, and the lower part holds an inscription in ancient Hebrew script. / AFP PHOTO / GALI TIBBON (Photo credit should read GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)
Benyamin Storchan, excavations director of the Israel Antiquities Authority, shows a decorated mosaic floor part of the remains of a 1,500-year-old (Byzantine Period) monastery and church, recently discovered in the southern hills of Israeli city of Beit Shemesh, on December 20, 2017. The operations are part of large-scale excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority with the help of over 1,000 teenagers, prior to the expansion of the Ramat Beit Shemesh neighborhood. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
An Israel Antiquities Authority volunteer uncovers a mosaic floor, part of the remains of a 1,500-year-old (Byzantine Period) monastery and church, recently discovered in the southern hills of Israeli city of Beit Shemesh, on December 20, 2017. The operations are part of large-scale excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority with the help of over 1,000 teenagers, prior to the expansion of the Ramat Beit Shemesh neighborhood. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Archaeologists from the Israeli Antiquities Authority, inspect a cave near a recently discoveread Edomean era structre, at ancient ruins of Amuda, near the town of Beit Guvrin on November 30, 2017. A 2200-year-old (Hellenistic period) structure, possibly an Edomean palace or temple, was uncovered during in archaeological excavations at the site of Horvat Amuda, situated at the heart of a military training area in the Lachish region. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Michal Haber, a member of the Israeli Antiquities Authority, displays an Edomean era incense burner adorned with an image of a bull, that was recently discovered at the ancient ruins of Amuda, near the village of Amazya on November 30, 2017. A 2200-year-old (Hellenistic period) structure, possibly an Edomean palace or temple, was uncovered during in archaeological excavations at the site of Horvat Amuda, situated at the heart of a military training area in the Lachish region. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Workers restore a ceiling of the Western Wall tunnels near the site where Israeli Antiquity Authority recently discovered an ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Joe Uziel, an archeologist from the Israeli Antiquity Authority, works on a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Tehillah Lieberman, an archeologist of the Israeli Antiquity Authority, shows journalists a recently discovered ancient roman theatre from the second sanctuary that was found at the foot of the Western Wall tunnels in Jerusalem's Old City on October 16, 2017. Excavations conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority have uncovered large portions of the Western Wall that have been hidden for 1,700 years. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Archaeologist Annette Landes-Nagar, of Israel's Antiquities Authority, displays ancient coins from the era of the Byzantine Empire (Seventh century), which were found last summer during excavations near the Arab Israeli village of Abu Ghosh near Jerusalem, during a press tour of the national treasures storerooms of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Beit Shemesh on March 19 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
Joe Uziel, of the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), who is the director of an excavation project where evidence of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians has recently been unearthed, speaks at the site in the City of David archeological park near Jerusalem's Old City on July 26, 2017. The structures dating to more than 2,600 years ago have been unearthed after having been covered over by collapsed layers of stone revealing many findings such as charred wood, grape seeds, pottery, fish scales and bones, and unique, rare artifacts including dozens of storage jars which served to store both grain and liquids. / AFP PHOTO / GALI TIBBON (Photo credit should read GALI TIBBON/AFP/Getty Images)
A worker of the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Nature and Parks Authority works at the ''stepped street'' in a underground tunnel at the 2,000 year old 'Second Temple Period Street' discovered in the David City located in the Palestinian neighbourhood of Silwan, outside the southern part of Jerusalem's Old City, on May 25, 2017. Israel Antiquities Authority and the Nature and Parks Authority are unveiling evidence from 2,000 year ago of the battle of Jerusalem following the destruction of the Second Temple, at the City of David in the Jerusalem Walls National Park. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
A first century Ossuary, bearing an old Hebrew text, is displayed during a press tour at the national treasures storerooms of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Beit Shemesh on March 19, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MENAHEM KAHANA (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
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