The most controversial aspect of Trump's speech led to Democrats booing him and shouting 'that's not true'

  • Democrats booed President Donald Trump after he announced his immigration proposal.
  • It was the only time Democrats booed Trump during his State of the Union address.


Democrats booed President Donald Trump, with at least one member of Congress shouting "that's not true," when the president outlined his proposed cuts to legal immigration.

After detailing the first two "pillars" of his immigration proposal, which include offering a path to citizenship for roughly 1.8 million non-citizen immigrants and building a massive wall along the southern border of the US, coupled with increased funding for border security, Trump spoke of his highly controversial cuts to legal immigration.

"The third pillar ends the visa lottery — a program that randomly hands out green cards without any regard for skill, merit, or the safety of our people," he said. "It is time to begin moving towards a merit-based immigration system — one that admits people who are skilled, who want to work, who will contribute to our society, and who will love and respect our country."

13 PHOTOS
Democrats wear black to Trump's State of the Union
See Gallery
Democrats wear black to Trump's State of the Union
Members of Congress wearing black outifts in solidarity with the #MeToo and #TimesUP movements listen as US President Donald Trump delivers the State of the Union address at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 30, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic female members of Congress, wearing black to support the #MeToo movement and buttons referring to 1944 rape victim Recy Taylor, arrive on the House floor to watch U.S. President Donald Trump deliver his State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, second left, sits for a photograph with members of Congress while wearing black in support of the #MeToo movement at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. President Donald Trump plans to promote the Republican tax overhaul he signed into law in his first State of the Union speech on Tuesday night, but fiscal headwinds mean hes likely to have less legislative success in his second year in office. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Democratic female members of Congress, wearing black to support the #MeToo movement and buttons referring to 1944 rape victim Recy Taylor, arrive on the House floor to watch U.S. President Donald Trump deliver his State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi talks with other female Democratic members of the House wearing black in support of the #MeToo movement as they wait to listen to U.S. President Donald Trump's State of the Union address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Members of Congressional Black Caucus wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest ahead of a State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. President Donald Trump plans to promote the Republican tax overhaul he signed into law in his first State of the Union speech on Tuesday night, but fiscal headwinds mean hes likely to have less legislative success in his second year in office. Photographer: Mark Wilson/Pool via Bloomberg
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (C), D-CA, poses with members of Congress wearing black in support of the 'metoo' movement in the Rayburn Room of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on January 30, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (L), Democrat of Florida, speaks with other attendees as she awaits the State of the Union address at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 30, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Members of Congress wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest before the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the first State of the Union address given by U.S. President Donald Trump and his second joint-session address to Congress. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (C), Democrat of Florida, awaits the State of the Union address at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 30, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, second left, sits for a photograph with members of Congress while wearing black in support of the #MeToo movement at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. President Donald Trump plans to promote the Republican tax overhaul he signed into law in his first State of the Union speech on Tuesday night, but fiscal headwinds mean hes likely to have less legislative success in his second year in office. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (C), D-CA, poses with members of Congress wearing black in support of the 'metoo' movement in the Rayburn Room of the US Capitol in Washington, DC on January 30, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: Members of Congress wear black clothing and Kente cloth in protest during the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the first State of the Union address given by U.S. President Donald Trump and his second joint-session address to Congress. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"The fourth and final pillar protects the nuclear family by ending chain migration," he continued. "Under the current broken system, a single immigrant can bring in virtually unlimited numbers of distant relatives. Under our plan, we focus on the immediate family by limiting sponsorships to spouses and minor children."

Trump said the reforms were necessary for economic and security reasons, and tied two recent terror attacks in New York to the visa lottery program and family reunification, which Trump and some Republicans refer to as "chain migration."

"It is time to reform these outdated immigration rules, and finally bring our immigration system into the 21st century," he said. "These four pillars represent a down-the-middle compromise, and one that will create a safe, modern, and lawful immigration system."

Democrats quickly booed the president, the only time during his address that the opposition party jeered Trump.

Trump's immigration proposal was widely derided by the left and some on the right after it was announced.

NOW WATCH: A Georgetown professor explains how Martin Luther King Jr. 'has been severely whitewashed'

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Trump kept clapping into the microphone during the State of the Union and Twitter wasn't having it

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.